Why aren't The Classic Disney Shorts legally available?

Latest News

AnimaniacNutso

Well-Known Member
Sep 4, 2017
250
Ratings
443 1
63
17
#1
Seriously? Why aren't The Classic Disney Shorts really legally available anywhere outside of those Walt Disney Treasures DVDs that are now very hard to find and expensive?

Most stuff from around that time like Looney Tunes and Tom and Jerry are pretty accessible, but there's not really much of a legal way to watch The Classic Disney Shorts. To me, this doesn't really make much sense because Mickey Mouse is the face of Disney and he's still iconic today with his successful new series of shorts and his successful Disney Junior shows. Donald and Goofy are also still beloved. Not only that, but these cartoons are timeless enough that a new generation of kids would probably love them.

It's very weird how Disney puts some of their old shows that were never really that popular like that 101 Dalmatians show (Which I enjoy, but it was never one of their most popular Animated Shows based off a movie) on iTunes, Youtube, Google Play, and Amazon, yet they won't put a collection featuring the most iconic Disney characters on there. At the very least, Disney could play these Classic Disney Shorts at 3AM on The Disney Channel/Disney XD/Disney Junior (The reason I say Disney Junior as well is because there was a time when Good Morning, Mickey!, Donald Duck Presents, Mickey's Mouse Tracks, and Donald's Quack Attack aired during the preschool block). I mean, they basically made Disney very popular and what it is today.

Sorry if this thread sounded like I was complaining. It's just strange how Disney hasn't made these shorts legally available in a while, compared to Looney Tunes and Tom and Jerry which are legally available.
 

Red Arrow

Proud Beneluxer
Oct 22, 2012
12,740
Ratings
3,454 67 1
113
21
Belgium
#2
?!

Tom and Jerry and the classic Walt Disney shorts are legally available, most Looney Tunes shorts are not.

You can still find Walt Disney Treasures on Amazon. Yes, many are quite expensive but you've had your chance, I'd say.

Perhaps the shorts will be available on their new streaming service in 2019. If not, then perhaps not enough people bought the DVDs. At least Disney tried. The day Warner Bros releases Daffy 101... will probably never come. I am not even hoping on it, either, since Europe didn't even get Porky 101.
 

AnimaniacNutso

Well-Known Member
Sep 4, 2017
250
Ratings
443 1
63
17
#3
?!

Tom and Jerry and the classic Walt Disney shorts are legally available, most Looney Tunes shorts are not.

You can still find Walt Disney Treasures on Amazon. Yes, many are quite expensive but you've had your chance, I'd say.

Perhaps the shorts will be available on their new streaming service in 2019. If not, then perhaps not enough people bought the DVDs. At least Disney tried. The day Warner Bros releases Daffy 101... will probably never come.
The Looney Tunes shorts with Bugs, Daffy, Porky, etc. are still legally available. Those shorts I believe still air on Boomerang

I will admit though that you are correct that a lot of the shorts aren't legally available, like the ones featuring the lesser known characters
 

Fone Bone

Matt Zimmer
Jan 19, 2004
23,876
Ratings
2,465 4
113
42
Framingham, MA
#4
?!
You can still find Walt Disney Treasures on Amazon. Yes, many are quite expensive but you've had your chance, I'd say.
No disrespect intended, but this is the wrong way to look at it. What about future generations of Disney fans who haven't even been born yet? Did they have their chance? They will have no way to access the classic cartoons at all. Disney is not preserving its legacy by keeping everything in the Vault. It's hurting both its past and its future.
 
Aug 20, 2017
158
Ratings
81 8
18
23
#5
No disrespect intended, but this is the wrong way to look at it. What about future generations of Disney fans who haven't even been born yet? Did they have their chance? They will have no way to access the classic cartoons at all. Disney is not preserving its legacy by keeping everything in the Vault. It's hurting both its past and its future.
You know your company's boned when pirates are doing a better job at archival than the company's archival team, but still insist on trying to self-archive when pirates do a better job.
HDnet knew that Pirates were better archivists, and as such never protected anything so that pirates could do their thing, and be an archival source.
 

Red Arrow

Proud Beneluxer
Oct 22, 2012
12,740
Ratings
3,454 67 1
113
21
Belgium
#6
No disrespect intended, but this is the wrong way to look at it. What about future generations of Disney fans who haven't even been born yet? Did they have their chance? They will have no way to access the classic cartoons at all. Disney is not preserving its legacy by keeping everything in the Vault. It's hurting both its past and its future.
From an economic point of view, this IS the way to look at things. They kept reprinting (or whatever it's called) until the point where it's no longer profitable. They keep reprinting The Lion King etc. because those are still profitable.

Again, wait till the new streaming service launches...
 

Fone Bone

Matt Zimmer
Jan 19, 2004
23,876
Ratings
2,465 4
113
42
Framingham, MA
#7
From an economic point of view, this IS the way to look at things. They kept reprinting (or whatever it's called) until the point where it's no longer profitable. They keep reprinting The Lion King etc. because those are still profitable.

Again, wait till the new streaming service launches...
The Walt Disney Treasures DVDs DID sell. That's why there were so many of them. It makes no sense as to why Disney isn't rereleasing them when they sold so well originally. They could even offer a Blu-Ray update to get people to double-dip. It makes no sense for those shorts not being on the market for over ten years. None.
 

Red Arrow

Proud Beneluxer
Oct 22, 2012
12,740
Ratings
3,454 67 1
113
21
Belgium
#8
The first box of the Walt Disney shorts ("Mickey Mouse in Living Color") got 150 000 sets for the United States and Canada. Many more were made elsewhere.

The twelfth and last box ("The Chronological Donald, Volume 4") only got 39 500 sets, simply because there was a lot less interest by 2008.

Basic economics. If the sales decrease each year, it means it won't be worth it to make more.

Of course, you could argue that this is Disney's own fault. I read somewhere that Walt Disney shorts were barely broadcasted in the US? Here in Belgium, they were broadcast daily till 2006, and after that you could still see them from time to time.
 

AnimaniacNutso

Well-Known Member
Sep 4, 2017
250
Ratings
443 1
63
17
#9
The first box of the Walt Disney shorts ("Mickey Mouse in Living Color") got 150 000 sets for the United States and Canada. Many more were made elsewhere.

The twelfth and last box ("The Chronological Donald, Volume 4") only got 39 500 sets, simply because there was a lot less interest by 2008.

Basic economics. If the sales decrease each year, it means it won't be worth it to make more.

Of course, you could argue that this is Disney's own fault. I read somewhere that Walt Disney shorts were barely broadcasted in the US? Here in Belgium, they were broadcast daily till 2006, and after that you could still see them from time to time.
The last time they were broadcasted in the US was in 2002 on Toon Disney (Donald's Quack Attack) and Vault Disney (The Ink and Paint Club). By that time, The Disney Channel was mostly a basic cable network and not a premium one much anymore
 

Classic Speedy

Yup.
Staff member
Moderator
Reporter
May 13, 2003
40,796
Ratings
598 2
83
#10
I bought The Complete Goofy Disney Treasures set a few years back but thanks to Disney's insistence in keeping everything OOP, I paid over double what it originally cost. [/sidebar]

Some of you (not necessarily in this thread) might be saying, "Disney probably doesn't want to re-issue the Treasures line on DVD or Blu-ray because the DVD market is dying and it doesn't want to risk the cost." Then they can at least put them on one of the many download services available (iTunes, Amazon, etc.). There's really no excuse at this point. It costs next to nothing to do that.

Same can be said for most of its animated TV series. [/dead horse]
 

AnimaniacNutso

Well-Known Member
Sep 4, 2017
250
Ratings
443 1
63
17
#11
I bought The Complete Goofy Disney Treasures set a few years back but thanks to Disney's insistence in keeping everything OOP, I paid over double what it originally cost. [/sidebar]

Some of you (not necessarily in this thread) might be saying, "Disney probably doesn't want to re-issue the Treasures line on DVD or Blu-ray because the DVD market is dying and it doesn't want to risk the cost." Then they can at least put them on one of the many download services available (iTunes, Amazon, etc.). There's really no excuse at this point. It costs next to nothing to do that.

Same can be said for most of its animated TV series. [/dead horse]
The fact that the 101 Dalmatians Show and Jungle Cubs got on iTunes, Amazon, etc. before stuff like The New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh and The Classic Disney Shorts is honestly surprising. Mickey, Donald, Goofy, etc. are still the flagships of Disney and they still have new content with their new Disney Junior show and their currently running shorts series
 

Mandouga

Well-Known Member
Jun 27, 2007
8,898
Ratings
316 15
48
Newington, CT, USA
#13
Disney's Roku app has/had some of them available as "Mickey Mouse and Friends", but unfortunately, that app has since been taken down.

Also, I don't like the "piracy is better because the studios don't do anything" idea. The fact is piracy does hurt everyone, etc., etc. etc. I would talk about the "fair use" idea, but that's for another, not-entirely-related topic (although, I suspect that the Recycle Rex short can be seen for free since it's basically a 12 minute PSA*). Besides, this is Disney we're talking about, so admittedly, Disney should be the ones to act on this. When will they? Who knows? I can only say that panicking just makes a problem worse (I refer to when The Princess and the Frog came out in 2009, when it was taken out of movie theaters after only three months or so, but anyway...). Going back to the classic shorts, I don't know what else I can say other than, we're going to have to wait and see what happens. I don't like this either, and yes, Disney has been holding back^ (again), but complaining about it is only going to go so far...

*"Recycle, reduce, reuse! And close the loop!..."

^For example, they never bothered to include the "Soccermania" special on any of the (original) DuckTales DVD set (Soccermania is pretty much an early version of the show). As for why the three movies aren't includes, I suspect there could be any number of reasons...