"Batman" (1989) Talkback (Spoilers)

Discussion in 'DC Live-Action Movies and Television' started by The Penguin, Jul 11, 2002.

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Rate "Batman"

  1. *****

    41 vote(s)
    34.7%
  2. ****1/2

    22 vote(s)
    18.6%
  3. ****

    26 vote(s)
    22.0%
  4. ***1/2

    12 vote(s)
    10.2%
  5. ***

    5 vote(s)
    4.2%
  6. **1/2

    4 vote(s)
    3.4%
  7. **

    2 vote(s)
    1.7%
  8. *1/2

    2 vote(s)
    1.7%
  9. *

    1 vote(s)
    0.8%
  10. 1/2

    3 vote(s)
    2.5%
  1. Cortez2301

    Cortez2301 Active Member

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    I hated Schumaccer's films.They ruined the batman Franchise.Though i have to admit "Batman forever" was the lesser of two evils.At least that one was darker and more serious than the Geoge Clooney movie.I wonder why they put him as the dark knight.Maybe they liked his Bruce wayne audition so much that they forgot about what happens when he puts on the cape and cowl.
     
  2. RAINMAN

    RAINMAN Kikoutei Densetsu

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    WB wanted a kind and funny batman that kids could look up to.
     
  3. Cortez2301

    Cortez2301 Active Member

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    Yeah but that ruins Batman.He is supposed to be a Dark and serious character.If thats what WB wanted they should have let it go to DTV.
     
  4. Eddie G.

    Eddie G. Former Wolf/Writer.

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    Burton's Batman was pretty silly too. I mean he was dark, but he also slept hanging upside down and casually set people on fire. Batman and Batman Returns just aren't serious films, they're very campy and darker adaptations of the original Batman TV series.

    Nolan is really the only person who tried to look at Batman in a truly serious light in a live-action format with Begins.

    If anything Batman Forever stands above the rest of the 89-97 series for actually exploring who Batman was as a character.
     
  5. Cortez2301

    Cortez2301 Active Member

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    I agree.I actually like Nolan's Batman much more than Burton's one.I am still surprised at the deaths that Batman caused in "Batman returns".BUT I still like Burton's Batman no matter what.Not more than Begins but still i really like it.It helped people change their ideas of Batman.Batman Begins is more into keeping their stories close tot he comics but also leaving a few twists at the end(So far there is only one twist but 'm sure there will be more).
     
  6. Eddie G.

    Eddie G. Former Wolf/Writer.

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    I give credit that the idea of having a darker Batman opened the doors for The Animated Series which really did have a direct influence on our generation, showing us who Batman truly is as a character. Still, I think saying it changed anyone's minds is going a little far. I've asked my dad and other people who grew up with the 1960's Batman series, and to them that's Batman. My dad still likes The Animated Series and Begins, but that doesn't mean Adam West still isn't his Batman. Just like Kevin from the animated series will always be my Batman, as much as I like Begins and The Batman.

    What's kind of funny though is that Batman and Batman Returns is basically the 1960's series Burtonized. The Joker and the Penguin are very much more twisted versions of their series counterparts. Nicholson's performance has a lot of influence from Romero's performance. The Penguin in Batman Returns is very much like a mutated version of Meredith's Penguin to the point where the character has very little in common with the actual source material since he's an adaptation of an adaptation. The fight scenes are very over the top and campy with inept and goofy faceless thugs. The cops just become jokes in the film playing off the idea that in the series that they rely on Batman so much.
     
  7. Cortez2301

    Cortez2301 Active Member

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    Well I don't know about the 60s being similar to burton's movies.Burton himself stated in the commentary for batman that this movie is definitely much different than the 60s version.There is alot of correct things in what you said but I wouldn't compare Romero's Joker to Nicholson's one.Romro was just a clown having fun and making tricks.Burtons was to torture and kill.I respect you ideas and opinions of course but this is what I believe.
     
  8. PeterFries

    PeterFries Active Member

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    That was pretty much the only good thing about the previous Bat-franchise, albeit a pretty great thing.
     
  9. RAINMAN

    RAINMAN Kikoutei Densetsu

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    If 89 didn`t change people minds then I dought begins will change it either.The only way to do that is by making them read the batman comic book. The penguin was never a deadly bat rouge. so I can understand why burt wanted his version to be a monster but no matther how hard they try the PEN will never be on the level of joker,two face,ivy etc... As for the cops relaying on batman help? Well Gorden does relay on batman help in all version starting whit the comic. 89 is the only one where he was trying to arrest batman for killing jack...which we would find out later was not really dead after all.:sweat:
     
  10. MR.MXYZPTLK

    MR.MXYZPTLK Mild Mannered Reporter

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    I loved the Burton films, but I have to agree. Burtons movies seemed more like darkened adaptions of the 60's, and not Frank Millers comics as Burton claims.
     
  11. Silly McGooses

    Silly McGooses Active Member

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    I thought they were stylistically very much like Miller's books, certainly more than Batman Begins.. I really don't see any similarity to any version of Batman in the 60s...
     
  12. dc_gothamite

    dc_gothamite dead is dead

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    I think "Begins" had more of the Miller inspiration... especially in regards to Batman's methods (ie. the bats) and the state of Gotham (ie. the narrows)

    Burton's vision definitely has the Neal Adams look... and to this day, despite my love for "Begins," I still love it. :D
     
  13. Justice League 2000

    Justice League 2000 Active Member

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    Batman and Batman returns are Both Great Great movies.

    Batman 1989

    The Good
    All the actors were great in that movie.

    Batman returns

    The Good
    All the actors were still great in that movie.
     
  14. Nightwing

    Nightwing WF Old Man

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    I'm pretty sure that upside down scene in Batman '89 was simply Bruce excercising. Crunches, for example, are a lot more effective if you're hanging upside down.

    I didn't realize it until a poster pointed it out, but Batman Returns' Bruce Wayne/Batman was in fact a bit on the wise cracking side, so I can understand opinions that say he's lighter. It's just, I don't think it was a part of his personality as much as it was in the irritating Batman & Robin. There's a difference between a dark story having some comic relief (normal writing technique) and a trainwreck of a movie. It can't compare to the Adam West series. The Adam West series was unforgivingly campy because that's how some things were in the time period. Plus the writing and dialogue, even when campy and unforgivable, was intelligent.

    I'll agree with Eddie G about Batman Forever. It was odd, but it was memorable, and at the very least it was an attempt. The only gripe I can think of in terms of that topic, though, is Batman's last line to The Riddler felt off in it's writing and delivery. As far as I've known from being a Batman fan, he doesn't choose to be Batman exactly, since it's something he has to do.
     
  15. James Harvey

    James Harvey The World's Finest
    Staff Member Administrator Moderator Reporter

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    Just in time for The Dark Knight, let's look back at this classic motion-picture!

    [​IMG]

    Studio: Warner Brothers
    Release Date: Summer 1989
    Director: Tim Burton
    Starring: Michael Keaton, Jack Nicholson, Kim Basinger

    Synopsis: Released in theaters in the summer of 1989, "Batman" featured the return of the Dark Knight to the silver screen for the first time since the television series from the 1960s and the feature film with the show's characters. Jack Nicholson starred as The Joker, Batman's most well-known villain, and Michael Keaton starred as Batman/Bruce Wayne for director Tim Burton. Kim Basinger played photojournalist Vickie Vale with Robert Wuhl as reporter Alexander Knox. Veteran actors Pat Hingle and Michael Gough joined the cast in their first outings as Commissioner Gordon and Alfred respectively. In his only Batman appearance, Billy Dee Williams portrayed District Attorney Harvey Dent.

    Comments?


    Note: We appreciate and encourage discussion, so please keep your posts as civil, thoughtful, relevant and insightful as possible. Please do not post any improper or inflammatory material. We will issue warnings if we believe it necessary. Please keep discussion ON-TOPIC!
     
  16. Alucard

    Alucard Member

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    I still like this version of batman alot. I get the impression that Burton hadn't read any of the comics, and was just going on what he had seen from the TV Series as many pointed out. This first movie, is alot less campy than Returns, and I think Burton was given less free reign, its all the better for it.

    The best thing about this movie is probably Gotham City. Its dirty, gothic and feels somewhat like 1930's America. The Joker isn't my favourite incarnation, but he is given an interesting origin, which reminds me of old Gangster movies. The version of Bruce in these films is a pretty shallow superhero. We don't get much motivation, it almost seems like he's doing it all for fun, not justice.

    I was never that into Batman Begins, but I'll be interested to see how The Dark Knight Returns version of Joker will fair when compared to Nicolsons performance
     
  17. Michael24

    Michael24 Moderator
    Staff Member Moderator

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    This is still my favorite Batman movie.

    Like Alucard said, the Gotham City of this movie is great. The GC of the Nolan films just seems to..... "normal." It's like it could have been in any major city like Los Angeles or New York. I like the fact that Burton's Gotham actually has a gothicness to it, the way I would expect Gotham City to look.
     
  18. Movie06

    Movie06 Active Member

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    My third favorite Batman film (Returns is my second favorite). I'd like to thank Tim Burton for making Batman dark again since 1989. I mean everything in the movie was just great. I mean, Keaton rocked as Batman and so did Nicholson as The Joker.
     
  19. email2003

    email2003 *Classically Trained*

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    One of the reasons why I didn't enjoy Batman Begins. Gotham City looks like a city of today than the city Tim Burton had in Batman.
     
  20. Young Justice

    Young Justice Silent Master Apprentice

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    Batman killed Joker?

    Continuation from a discussion started on TDK thread

    The gargoyle broke just from Joker keeping his grip on the ladder and pulling against it; it's extremely unlikely it would have supported his weight if he had let go and fallen and been dangling from it. Besides, it would take a lot of cajones to let go and allow yourself to fall (even a short distance) and dangle anyway, don't you think? It seems to me the natural self-preservation instinct would be to hang onto the rope ladder for dear life.[/quote]

    I think I have written my ideas in a confusing manner. Let me put it that way: If it was only up to Burton, I think Batman would have tossed Joker directly from the tower. The NES video-game of the movie shows a scene like that. But for the sake of not portraying Batman as a explicit killer and executioner, they toned down the scene quite a bit, making ambiguous if Batman was trying to kill Joker or merely preventing him to escape when he trapped the clown of crime's foot with the Gargoyle.

    The scene I was referring is on Batman Returns. Batman faces a giant from the circus. He punches the giant on the belly. The giant barely moves. The giant smiles on Batman. Batman smiles back. The giant looks at his belt and it's a bomb attached to him. Batman tosses the giant on the sewer. Batman leaves the scene as an explosion happens inside the sewer.
     

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