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Why is it that The Tale of the White Serpent, Magic Boy, and Alakazam the Great were the first anime

Discussion in 'Back To The Inkwell - Classic Cartoons Discussion' started by Ktommy96, Mar 29, 2016.

  1. Ktommy96

    Ktommy96 Banned

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    I mean, like, seriously. The oldest-surviving animated feature film The Adventures of Prince Achmed was released in 1926 in Germany and 1931 in the United States. Then in 1947, The Humpbacked Horse was released, and two years later, it was subtitled in English in the United States. Later that same year, The Emperor's Nightingale was released in Czechoslovakia, and was dubbed in English in the United States in 1951. And in 1950, Johnny the Giant Killer was released in 1950 in France, and was supposedly dubbed in English in the United States in 1953. And then in 1952, The Scarlet Flower and The Snow Maiden were released in the Soviet Union, and were supposedly dubbed in English in 1953. Later that same year, The Curious Adventures of Mr. Wonderbird was released in France, and dubbed in English in the United States in 1957. Later THAT same year, The Snow Queen was released in the Soviet Union, and dubbed in English two years later. But in 1961, the first anime films to be released and distributed internationally were The Tale of the White Serpent, Magic Boy, and Alakazam the Great, which were all originally released in 1958, 1959, and 1960, respectively in Japan. But why is that? Was it because releasing and distributing anime films internationally was considered taboo before that year, was it because they were worried that they would flop if they released them until that year, was it because audiences wanted every single foreign animated film, even anime ones, to be distributed worldwide, was it because of the possible rise of every non-Disney animated film being produced and released almost every year, or was it because releasing anime films internationally wasn't their thing until that year?
     
  2. Steve Burstein

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    ER, It's complicated. There WAS much animation in Japan before the late 50s, but looking at it one senses that it was just not of an international caliber. Japanese animation of the late 50s-early 60s compared far more favorably to that era's US animation than 30s Japanese animation did compared to US. And there simply weren't any feature length animated films coming out of Japan before the late 50s(the longest one was 45 minutes), so there really hadn't been much of anything to try to market.
     
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