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The Top 50 Animated Television Shows

Discussion in 'Platypus Comix' started by Greg1, Mar 2, 2007.

  1. Greg1

    Greg1 Ness Vet

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    Here's how it works!

    You were asked to send me a list of your 25 favorite animated television show. Five ballots were received, and the show were ranked on a point system allowing 25 points for a #1 choice, 24 for a #2, and all the way down to 1 point for #25. The points were added up, and what follows are your selections.

    Tiebreakers work like such: If two show have equal pointage (and neither got a number 1 vote), the show that appeared on the most lists ranks higher. If those shows appeared on the same amount of lists, I went with whatever ranked highest on the individual list. A show that was someone's #4 beats another person's #6, for example. And then if they still were tied I just picked one.

    What we don't want: your entire lists posted, cloggin' up yer thread
    What we do want: everything else. Kick yourself for fogetting one show or another/debate on if one show is better then the other/etc. Discussion is the whole point!

    The countdown begins now. Let your conversations begin~!
     
  2. Greg1

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    "You know, you're making it really difficult to be an eco-villan."

    [​IMG]

    50. Captain Planet and the Planeteers (1990) - 11 points


    Gaia, the spirit of the Earth, is awoken from a long sleep by human activity destroying the planet. Realizing that the damage was extensive, Gaia created five magic rings, each with the power to control an element of nature and one controlling the show-specific element, heart. Gaia sent the rings to five chosen youths across the globe: Kwame, Wheeler, Linka, Gi, and Ma-Ti.

    In situations that the Planeteers could not handle on their own, they could combine and magnify their powers to summon Captain Planet, who possesses all of their powers magnified (although in practice his powers seem to expand to include whatever the writers currently have in mind), symbolizing that the combined efforts of a team are stronger than its individual parts. Captain Planet only appears in his Captain Planet garb. These are not clothes but elements of the Earth that are integral to his composition. He is able to rearrange his molecular structure to transform himself into the various powers and elements of nature, e.g., water, wind, fire, ice, etc. Captain Planet's outfit does not represent a specific culture. He has grass-green hair, sky-blue skin, earthy brown eyes, blood-red chest, gloves and boots, and sunlight-yellow insignia/globe. In a manner similar to the early Superman, Planet has seemingly godlike superhuman powers, and seems to gain more to deal with whatever the situation requires. However, his "kryptonite" is pollutants which sap his strength, from smog to radiation.

    A relatively common criticism of the show was that its theme as a superhero show made it unhelpful as an educational tool. It has been argued that while the show effectively presented pollution and environmental destruction as bad, the very nature of the show meant that it did not explore the reasons why pollution and environmental destruction occur. Instead, this argument says, the show presented these things as the result of direct and deliberate action by evil villains who often were out to damage the environment purely for the sake of doing so, either with no greater objective at all, or because of an exaggerated and overly stereotypical motive.

    The show's related merchandise was also criticised as hypocritical. A show promoting environmental awareness and recycling undermined its own message, this argument goes, by selling plastic action figures and similar toys.
     
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    "Dear Journal, hi! It's me, Doug."

    [​IMG]

    49. Doug (1991) - 11 points


    Doug was an animated television series on Nickelodeon and is the first Nicktoon ever made, starring a 6th grader named Doug Funnie (full name: Douglas Yancey Funnie). The series originated with an unpublished book, Doug Got a New Pair of Shoes, by artist and series creator Jim Jinkins and writer Joe Aaron, which was followed up by a USA network promo featuring Doug and his dog Porkchop, and an ad for Florida Grapefruit Juice.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7kVm-MfP1E
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iUiSDtAwITI

    In February 1996, Disney bought Jumbo Pictures, and ordered new episodes of Doug to be produced (renamed Brand Spanking New! Doug and then later Disney's Doug). The new episodes featured a new theme song and brought a new baby sister for Doug as well as a change in age to 12½ years old. It also brought a new haircut for Patti, more money for Roger, weight loss for Connie, and much more. This included a change of clothes for everyone and a brand new middle school. These episodes aired on ABC's One Saturday Morning cartoon block from September 1996 to September 9, 2000. In March of 1999, Disney introduced Doug: Live! to its Walt Disney World theme park. This musical stage show based on the television series ran at Disney-MGM Studios until May of 2001. After 65 additional episodes and a theatrical feature-length film, Disney's Doug went out of production in 1999.
     
    #3 Greg1, Mar 2, 2007
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  4. Greg1

    Greg1 Ness Vet

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    "Now you can see three cartoon originals... IN ONE SHOW!"

    [​IMG]

    48. The What A Cartoon Show (1995) - 12 points


    What a Cartoon! (originally known as World Premiere Toons, later as "The Big Cartoon Show" now known as The Cartoon Cartoon Show), was the mid-1990s animation showcase that appeared on the Cartoon Network. It served as the launching point for several original cartoons including Dexter's Laboratory, Johnny Bravo, Cow and Chicken, The Powerpuff Girls, Courage the Cowardly Dog, I Am Weasel, and Mike, Lu and Og. The Big Cartoon DataBase cites What a Cartoon!/World Premiere Toons as a "venture combining classic 1940s production methods with the originality, enthusiasm and comedy of the 1990s."

    World Premiere Toons was an animation project conceived and produced by Fred Seibert, the original creative director of MTV and Nickelodeon who served as the president of Hanna-Barbera Cartoons, Inc., prior to founding Frederator Studios. Its mission was to return creative power to animators and artists, by recreating the atmospheres that spawned the great cartoon characters of the mid-20th century. Each of 48 short cartoons mirrored the structure of a theatrical cartoon, with each film being based on an original storyboard drawn and written by its artist/creator.

    The first World Premiere Toon to be broadcast in its entirety was The Powerpuff Girls' "Meat Fuzzy Lumpkins", which made its world premiere on February 20, 1995 during a television special called the World Premiere Toon-In (termed "President's Day Nightmare" by its producers, Williams Street). The special was hosted by Space Ghost and the cast of Space Ghost: Coast to Coast, and featured comic interviews and a mock contest with the creators of the various cartoons.
     
  5. Greg1

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    "This is so not fair! I mean, I realize Plastic Man is in the League too. I'm not dissing the guy's skills, but c'mon! I have it all over that guy! One time I disguised myself as a vase. For 3 days! "

    [​IMG]

    47. Justice League (2001) - 12 points


    Animator Bruce Timm, having successfully adapted both Batman and Superman into animated television programs in the 1990s, took on the challenge of faithfully adapting the Justice League comic book. Ignoring the sidekicks, pets and other extraneous elements of the earlier Super Friends show, the line-up of this new JLA adaptation was created with two things in mind: to pay tribute to the original line-up of the Justice League of America while also reflecting racial and cultural diversity. Significantly, the well-known (but much-depreciated) superhero Aquaman was left out of the lineup (although he would be used on the show) in favor of a second female on the team - Hawkgirl - and the African-American Green Lantern John Stewart, who has worked with the League in the comics before, was used rather than either of the better-known modern-era Green Lanterns Hal Jordan and Kyle Rayner, even though Rayner had appeared as Green Lantern in the Superman animated series. (In the second season, Rayner is described as a Lantern in training under Stewart's old mentor, explaining his absence. Both he and Jordan make brief appearances in Justice League Unlimited.)

    The show met with significant success, partially due to loyal fans already familiar with these incarnations of the characters, and partially from a new generation of viewers. The two-part nature of most episodes led Cartoon Network to choose to air the episodes back-to-back.

    In February 2004, Cartoon Network announced a follow-up series, Justice League Unlimited, which premiered on July 31, 2004. Justice League Unlimited features a greatly expanded roster of heroes, usually with only a few appearing in any given episode, although there are a few featuring just about the entire roster fighting against one giant enemy.
     
  6. Greg1

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    "I can't even say your name forwards, how am I supposed to say it backwards?"

    [​IMG]

    46. Superman: The Animated Series (1996) - 13 points


    Airing ten years after the 1986 "reboot" of the Superman comic book character, the animated series paid tribute to both the classic Superman of old and the newer "modern" Superman. Perhaps most significantly, Clark Kent displays the more aggressive personality used by John Byrne in his reboot of the comic book continuity. Elements of Superman from all eras of his history were included in the series, especially in a potrayal of the planet Krypton, the planet that Superman was born on, that fans praised as a "modernization" of Superman's origin that contrasted John Byrne's reboot, and some fans felt was superior to the "newer" comic book version. Notably, the evil computer Brainiac was not only now from Krypton, but was portrayed as responsible for preventing the knowledge of Krypton's imminent destruction from reaching its people. In a lesser innovation, the ship that carried the infant Kal-El to Earth was designed to land smoothly upon reaching its destination, rendering it in perfect working condition during Superman's adulthood and is used as his mode of long range transportation in space.

    While the series featured fresh recreations of much of Superman's rogues gallery, the series' writers supplemented the limited supply of enemies by paying tribute to Jack Kirby's Fourth World creations which also introduced the villain Darkseid to the series as one of Superman's greatest enemies. Darkseid had been portrayed as a villain in Super Friends: The Legendary Super Powers Show and The Super Powers Team: Galactic Guardians in the 1980s, but in the new Superman series, he was closer to the enormously powerful, evil cosmic emperor originally envisioned by Kirby. The tribute event extends to the supporting character, Dan "Terrible" Turpin, who is visually modelled on Jack Kirby himself.

    Due to Lex Luthor's pronounced lips and tanned skin, several fans mistakingly thought he was African-American. This is due to the Telly Savalas inspiration for his look - the reason for which is that producer Bruce Timm thought of Clancy Brown's take on Luthor as a "cultured thug", the same way he saw Savalas' Blofeld in On Her Majesty's Secret Service (Timm's favorite Bond film). Sometimes, the animated Luthor is portrayed as being distinctly darker than the people around him, and sometimes (like the shot in "A Little Piece of Home" where Luthor literally puts his face right into Superman's) his skin color is exactly the same as everybody else. Timm is rumored to quip that his Lex Luthor must "tan easily."


    More in a few hours
     
  7. Greg1

    Greg1 Ness Vet

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    "When Polly's in trouble, I am not slow, So it's hip! hip! hip! and away I go."

    [​IMG]

    45. Underdog (1964) - 13 points


    In 1960, handling the General Mills account as an account executive with the Dancer Fitzgerald Sample advertising agency in New York, W. Watts Biggers teamed with Chet Stover, Tread Covington and artist Joe Harris in the creation of television cartoon shows to sell breakfast cereals for General Mills. The shows introduced such characters as King Leonardo, Tennessee Tuxedo and Underdog. Biggers contributed both scripts and songs to the series. When Underdog became a success, Biggers and his partners left Dancer Fitzgerald Sample to form their own company, Total Television, with animation produced at Gamma Studios in Mexico. At the end of the decade, Total Television folded when General Mills dropped out as the sponsor in 1969. Only when it was shown on a major network like NBC were all four episodes shown on the same half hour, without the extra cartoons. The show is also remembered for its clever and dramatic theme song.

    Underdog was an anthropomorphic superhero parody of Superman and similar heroes with secret identities. The premise was that "humble and lovable" Shoeshine Boy, a cartoon dog, was in truth the superhero Underdog. George S. Irving narrated, and comedy actor Wally Cox provided the voices of both Underdog and Shoeshine Boy. When villains threatened, Shoeshine Boy ducked into a telephone booth where he transformed into the caped and costumed hero, destroying the booth in the process when his super powers were activated. Underdog almost always spoke in rhyme.

    Underdog gets his powers from a special "super energy pill" concealed in a special ring. Before taking one, he would utter the words, "The secret compartment of my ring I fill with an Underdog Super Energy Pill". He appears to be a normal, powerless being without it and must take one in order to use his powers. There have been times where he has overworked himself, and must take another pill in order to sustain his powers. Underdog is shown to have powers similar to Superman, including those of flight, super strength, and invulnerability to conventional weapons. However, the number and scope of his superpowers are inconsistent from episode to episode, being subject not only to the conventions of superhero comics, but also to the conventions of humorous cartoons. In one episode he easily moved planets, safely butting against them with his rear end. In another episode his super energy pill, diluted billions of times when added to a city's water system, was capable of giving normal humans who drank the water enough strength easily to bend thick steel bars. However, these strengths are not consistent; e.g., in another episode a simple metal sword stuck down the back of his outfit gave him disabling fits of pain.
     
  8. Greg1

    Greg1 Ness Vet

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    "Once I found a perpetual motion machine just lying in the trashcan. Of course, by then it had stopped moving."

    [​IMG]

    44. Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers (1989) - 13 points


    Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers was an American animated television series produced by Walt Disney Television Animation and created by Tad Stones and Alan Zaslove. It featured the classic Disney chipmunk characters Chip 'n Dale, with three new friends, as detectives. The show as originally conceptualized by Tad Stones was not centered around the Chip 'n Dale characters, but, as relayed by him, a rework with the chipmunks was ultimately green-lighted by Michael Eisner and Jeffrey Katzenberg.

    The series began airing on March 5, 1989 on the Disney Channel, where the first 13 episodes ran. With the airing of the two hour standalone television special, "Rescue Rangers: To the Rescue" in the fall of the same year, the show began its syndicated run, where it was often paired in an hour-long show with DuckTales. The last episode aired on November 19, 1990, by which time the series was a part of the then-fledgling Disney Afternoon and continued to air in its lineup until 1993.

    A popular eponymous Rescue Rangers platform video game was produced for the Nintendo Entertainment System by Capcom in 1990, followed by a less successful sequel. A third game was made for the PC. The video games featured gameplay that was rather similar to that of Super Mario Bros. 2. Although they did not strictly follow the premise of the TV series, some of the game missions did match episode plots, and included recurring appearances of minor series characters such as a mechanical dog and a robot.

    There were plans for a theatrical feature film based on the series (a 1990 issue of Comics Scene gave information on a planned release in 1991), but it never came to fruition, possibly because "DuckTales the Movie: Treasure of the Lost Lamp" underperformed at the box office.
     
  9. Greg1

    Greg1 Ness Vet

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    "If you can't beat 'em, join 'em... then beat 'em."

    [​IMG]

    43. The Super Mario Bros. Super Show! (1989) - 13 points


    The Super Mario Bros. Super Show! was the only one of the three American Mario animated series to air in syndication. The first and last parts of each episode were live action and showed Mario (played by "Captain" Lou Albano) and Luigi (Danny Wells) living in Brooklyn, where they would often be visited by celebrity guest stars, such as Cyndi Lauper, Danica McKellar, and a Cher impersonator. Occasionally, the main actors would be playing guest stars themselves, forcing their regular characters to leave when it came time for their other characters to show up.

    The second part of each episode was a cartoon based loosely on the Super Mario Bros. and Super Mario Bros. 2 video games, where Mario, Luigi, Princess Toadstool (as Peach was called in North America until the release of Yoshi's Safari), and her loyal mushroom retainer Toad battle against the reptilian villain King Koopa, often in a movie or pop-culture parody. Getting into the spirit of these parodies, Bowser usually had a different outfit for each one. Wart, the main antagonist of the second game, was never in any of the episodes, yet most of his minions appeared in the show.

    The Super Mario Bros. cartoon was shown on Mondays through Thursdays. On Fridays, the show would air the Legend of Zelda cartoons based on the game of the same name, in which the elf-like hero Link and Princess Zelda fight against the forces of the evil wizard Ganon. Scenes from the episode were shown during the live-action segments on the preceding days as sneak previews.
     
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    "My mentor is an over-sized chicken?"

    [​IMG]

    42. Mighty Max (1993) - 14 points


    Mighty Max was an animated action/sci-fi/horror television series which aired from 1993 to 1994 to promote the British Mighty Max toys, an offshoot of the Polly Pocket line, created by Bluebird Toys in 1992. It ran for two seasons, with a total of 40 episodes airing during the show's run. It starred the voice talents of Rob Paulsen as Max, Richard Moll as Norman, Tony Jay as Virgil, and Tim Curry as Skullmaster.

    The series follows Max, an adventurous preteen boy who receives a package in the mail. The package contains a small statue of a fowl, inscribed with Egyptian hieroglyphs. The translation reveals a message which reads: "You have been chosen to be the cap-bearer. Go to the mini-mart and wait for a sign, Mighty Max." Shocked by the message, Max drops the statue, shattering it and revealing a red baseball cap emblazoned with a yellow "M" which he puts on.

    Upon arriving at the mini-mart, he is chased by a lava-monster sent by Skullmaster, a megalomaniacal demon who lives within the earth and has the power to create evil minions. As Max races away, the cap activates a vortex which transports him instantly from his current location (which is assumed to be somewhere in the United States)Washington D.C., to the Mongolian desert, where Max is met by Virgil, a nearly-omniscient Lemurian, whose appearance is that of an anthropomorphic "fowl" (a running gag in the series is that Max refers to Virgil as a "chicken" to which the Lemurian replies "Fowl, actually."). Virgil explains that Max's reception of the cap was prophesized circa 3,000 BC. Max, Virgil, and Norman, his Viking bodyguard (he is three times bigger than Virgil), travel together around the world, defending Earth against the minions of Skullmaster, who is responsible for the downfall of both the Lemurians and the people of Atlantis. Norman (which may or may not be his real name) is supposedly immortal and has inspired legends of various heroes, including Sir Lancelot, Thor, Samson, and Hercules.

    In all episodes, there is a short ending scene which preludes the credits. Max is shown at his desk in his room, where he discusses with the audience some aspect of the episode in an educational way, usually the location where the events took place, &c. Occasionally, Max is shown in another setting such as a library or museum, or is simply heard recorded on an answering machine (such as "Armageddon Outta Here", the series finale). However, these sequences were not broadcast in some regions, such as Britain.

    The merchandising was far more popular than the show itself.
     
  11. Greg1

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    "Uh, listen Jet. You said bell peppers and beef. There's no beef in here. So you wouldn't really call it bell peppers and beef, now would you?"

    [​IMG]

    41. Cowboy Bebop (1998) - 14 points


    In the year 2071, the crew of the spaceship Bebop travel the solar system trying to apprehend bounties. In the slang of the era, "Cowboys" are bounty hunters. Most episodes revolve around a specific bounty, but the show often shares its focus with the pasts of one of each of the four main characters and of more general past events, which are revealed and brought together as the series progresses.

    Cowboy Bebop was almost not on Japanese broadcast television due to its depictions of violence. It was first sent to TV Tokyo, one of the main broadcasters of anime in Japan. However, at the time, TV Tokyo was avoiding violence and sexuality in anime after the notoriously controversial broadcast of Neon Genesis Evangelion between 1995-1996. The show had an aborted first run from April 3, 1998 until June 19, 1998 on TV Tokyo, broadcasting only episodes 2, 3, 7-15 and 18. There are rumors that the network purposely tried to "sabotage" the series (perhaps due to the climate in the aftermath of Evangelion), but there is evidence to suggest the time slot after April 23 was already booked, leaving little room for the new series. In fact, the episode number XX is said to have been protested by staff for the treatment of the show.

    One of the most notable elements of Cowboy Bebop is its music, performed by Yoko Kanno and The Seatbelts, a band Kanno assembled to perform music for the series. The jazz and blues themed soundtrack is a defining factor in the series, almost as much as the characters, writing, and even animation. Many fans find the soundtracks enjoyable to listen to as albums on their own, independent of the series.
     
  12. Greg1

    Greg1 Ness Vet

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    "I am the cheese. I am the best character on this show. I am better than the salami and the bologna combined."

    [​IMG]

    40. Rocko's Modern Life (1993) - 14 points


    Rocko's Modern Life was an American animated television series whose four seasons aired from 1993 to 1996. The show was based around the surreal, parodistic adventures of an anthropomorphic wallaby named Rocko, and his life in the city of O-Town. The series was created by Joe Murray. One of Nickelodeon's Nicktoons, it was the fourth series released in the Nicktoons group, and the first to be introduced since the original three were introduced in August 1991. The program was produced by Joe Murray Productions and Nickelodeon Studio, and occasionally by Games Productions.

    Rocko (voiced by Carlos Alazraqui) is a wallaby who emigrated from Australia to the United States. He is a sensible, moral, and somewhat timid character who enjoys the simple pleasures in life, such as doing his laundry or feeding his dog, Spunky. He is neat, compassionate, and self-conscious. Rocko usually works at "Kind of a Lot o' Comics" (but once worked at Conglom-O where Ed Bighead attempted to make him quit) and his hobbies include Rocko, as seen in Wimp On The Barbie.recreational jackhammering and pining for the love of his life, Melba Toast. Due to Rocko's benevolence and non-confrontational personality, he is often taken advantage of by the other characters. Rocko would prefer to live a quiet life, but his reckless friends often throw him into turbulent situations. His most common catchphrase is "______-Day is a very dangerous day," even once saying "Open Mike night is a very dangerous night."

    Heffer Wolfe (voiced by Tom Kenny) is Rocko's best friend, a happy-go-lucky and not-too-bright steer whom he met in high school. Heffer is an absolute glutton and loves to eat and party. Filburt (voiced by Doug "Mr." Lawrence) is Rocko's other best friend, a neurotic, hypochondriac turtle wearing Woody Allen-style glasses. He started out as a background character and became a main character in the second season. He lives in a trailer and earns his money by collecting cans "here and there", and has a penchant for "sauce".
     
  13. Greg1

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    "Cheer up, Gri... hey! Mandy's not my girlfriend! She's just my FRIEND, who HAPPENS to be a girl, just like I HAPPEN to be a boy, and you HAPPEN to be a skeleton! It's the differences that make our planet so rich! So diverse! And wonderful!"

    [​IMG]

    39. The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy (2001) - 14 points


    The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy, created by Maxwell Atoms, is an American animated television series that currently airs on Cartoon Network and Teletoon. The two main characters, Billy and Mandy, have obliged the Grim Reaper, here usually called Grim, to be their best friend forever after having won a bet over a sick hamster through a game of Limbo.

    The show's existence is largely the result of a viewer poll. An Internet and call-in event called the Big Pick was held from August 24 to August 25 in 2000. The three final choices were The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy, Whatever Happened to Robot Jones?, and Longhair and Doubledome. Out of the three, The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy won. The first season appeared on Cartoon Network in 2001. Robot Jones would later be made into a full series despite losing; Longhair and Doubledome would reappear with another pilot episode in another Big Pick-style show later on, only to fall short once again.

    Originally labelled Grim and Evil, the series was a combination of two shows in one. In each show, a segment of Evil Con Carne was put between two Grim cartoons. In 2003, the network separated Grim from Evil and gave both a full length show. The short-lived Evil Con Carne show was cancelled once all the already-made episodes were aired. In 2005, Evil Con Carne was given another short-lived run with the newly created intro and end credits, only to be cancelled again. Some characters from Evil Con Carne occasionally appear on The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy.

    In a "Behind The Scenes Interview" by Cartoon Network, Maxwell Atoms stated that Billy and Mandy originated from an Animated Student Film that he did while in college and that Grim and the conceptual idea came later on. He said that his prime influences as an animator are Surrealism, monster movies and old Saturday Morning Cartoons he watched as a kid. "I love the idea that anything is possible in animation. I learned a lot from all of the great animators working out here, too."
     
  14. Greg1

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    A random line from Romeo & Juliet

    [​IMG]

    38. Shakespeare: The Animated Tales (1992) - 15 points


    Shakespeare: The Animated Tales (also known as The Animated Shakespeare) comprised two six-part television series, first broadcast in 1992 and 1994. Each episode was an animated half-hour adaptation of one of Shakespeare's plays.

    The series was commissioned by BBC Wales for the Welsh language channel S4C (although it was commissioned in English). Production was co-ordinated by the Dave Edwards studio in Cardiff, and executed by well-known Russian directors and animators in Moscow. The scripts were written by children's author Leon Garfield, using mainly Shakespearian language. The academic consultant was professor Stanley Wells.

    For the English-language version, the productions generally used British actors for the voices. A Russian dubbing was recorded afterwards. After the success of the first series, the voice actors in the second series tended to be "bigger names".

    The series was noted for its wide range of animation techniques. The animation was done completely in Moscow at Christmasfilms Studio, by a selection of Russia's most renowned animators. Other animated adaptations produced by the same team include Operavox (1995) and The Canterbury Tales (1998–2000).
     
  15. Greg1

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    "A sea monster ate my ice cream!"

    [​IMG]

    37. DuckTales (1987) - 15 points


    DuckTales was the most successful of Disney's early attempts to create high-quality animation for a TV animated series (earlier shows included The Wuzzles and The Gummi Bears in 1985). Disney invested a far greater amount of money into the TV series than had previously been spent on animated shows of the time. This was considered a risky move, because animated TV series were generally considered low-budget, throwaway investments for most of the history of TV cartoons up through the 1980s. Most DuckTales episodes were animated in Asia by companies such as Cuckoo's Nest Studios, Wang Film Productions of Taiwan, and Tokyo Movie Shinsha of Japan.

    The general premise of the show was about the adventures experienced by Scrooge and his nephews. The nephews, who were originally living with their uncle Donald, were left in Scrooge's care when he went off to join the Navy. Being the richest duck in the world, Scrooge constantly came up with ways to try and increase his wealth, or to protect it from villains who wanted it for their own greed. In general, there were several different plotlines that were used throughout many of the episodes, although there were numerous other episodes with completely different plots.

    DuckTales was largely based on Carl Barks' classic Scrooge McDuck stories which ran in various Disney Comic publications. Scrooge was originally introduced as a supporting character in Donald Duck's stories but soon became so popular that he was given his own spinoff series, and soon became the center of what was eventually dubbed "The Scrooge McDuck Universe" by fans. Many DuckTales episodes, especially in the first season, are directly adapted from comic stories by Barks. Other major elements, such as Scrooge's money bin, the Junior Woodchuck organization, the city of Duckburg and many of its inhabitants, are culled directly from the comics.
     
  16. Greg1

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    "Kim Possible, you think you're all that, but you're not!"

    [​IMG]

    36. Kim Possible (2002) - 15 points


    Kim (voiced by Christy Carlson Romano) often finds herself criss-crossing the globe in an attempt to rescue people, stop crimes, and battle supervillains... all the while being expected to come home and complete her homework in time. Kim Possible attends Middleton High School, and is captain of the school's cheerleading squad. However, the red-haired crime fighter cannot save the world alone. Alongside her is Ron Stoppable, her goofy, wisecracking partner and boyfriend, and his scene-stealing pet naked mole rat, Rufus.

    The series premiered in June 2002, and the first episode to air, Crush, was nominated for a Primetime Emmy award the following year. With the premiere of this episode, Kim Possible was regarded as the most watched and highest rated television show on the Disney Channel at that time. The series as a whole was nominated for the Daytime equivalent in 2004, and again in 2005 (that year saw it receive 5 nominations with 1 win). The show has widely been praised for its smart dialogue, fluid animation, and engaging, well-written characters (both heroic and villainous).

    According to creators Mark McCorkle and Bob Schooley, they created the show in an elevator. As they tell it, McCorkle looked at Schooley and said, "Kim Possible: she can do anything." Schooley at once replied, "Her partner is Ron Stoppable: he can't do anything." The creators also maintain that it was always their intention for Kim and Ron to eventually become involved romantically, instead of remaining best friends. This becomes reality in the supposed series ending movie "Kim Possible: So the Drama." The romantic theme also continues in season four.
     
  17. Greg1

    Greg1 Ness Vet

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    "Atta boy, Mac! Down with tyranny! Up with... nontyranny!"

    [​IMG]

    35. Foster's Home For Imaginary Friends (2004) - 15 points


    Foster's Home For Imaginary Friends is a cartoon that takes place in a home where imaginary friends go, when their creators outgrow them. The inspiration came when Craig McCracken and his wife, Lauren Faust, adopted a pair of dogs from an adoption shelter. McCracken was then inspired to wonder what if there was a similar place for childhood imaginary friends.

    In this world, imaginary friends become real the instant a child imagines them. Unfortunately for the imaginary friends, the children outgrow them. When that happens, the friends are left to fend for themselves. Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends was founded by the elderly Madame Foster to provide a foster home (hence the title) for abandoned imaginary friends; their motto is "Where good ideas are not forgotten." There are (according to "Setting A President") 1,340 imaginary friends at Foster's Home. It has been suggested that the house itself may be imaginary, as well. In the end of "Emancipation Complication" Madame Foster states that there are 2,037 Imaginary Friends currently residing in the house.

    Foster's is completely animated in Adobe Flash, the backgrounds are cleaned up in Adobe Illustrator, and then both are compiled in Adobe After Effects. The idea saves some money compared to hand-drawn animation, but not a substantial amount.
     
  18. Greg1

    Greg1 Ness Vet

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    "If you didn't wake me up, I might've had a nightmare and it would've woke me up. Then, I could've woke you up and we would both be awake. But since you did wake me up, I can't wake up from this nightmare so I can't wake you up! So we're both still asleep."

    [​IMG]

    34. 2 Stupid Dogs (1993) - 16 points


    2 Stupid Dogs was a cartoon about a stupid dog and another stupid dog, with an animation style that was unusual (at the time); a very flat, simplistic style similar to early Hanna-Barbera cartoons of the 1950s and 60s, with early 1990s humor and sensibility.

    2 Stupid Dogs was the beginning of the successful revival of Hanna-Barbera's fortunes, since the studio had not launched a bona fide hit since The Smurfs in 1981. Turner Entertainment president installed MTV and Nickelodeon branding veteran Fred Seibert as the head of production. Seibert's plan to reinvent the studio was to put his faith in the talent community, a first for television animation, and HB in particular. His first pitch and first series put into production in 1992 was 2 Stupid Dogs, by recent California Institute of the Arts (CalArts) graduate Donovan Cook. The show was considered by some to be Hanna-Barbera's attempt to cash in on the popularity of Ren and Stimpy, which was at the height of its popularity when 2 Stupid Dogs hit the air. Ren and Stimpy creator John Kricfalusi was credited to adding "tidbits of poor taste" to the three Little Red Riding Hood episodes, and a few other Spumco artists also contributed to selected episodes during the course of the show.

    Several artists and directors from the show became the first creators in Seibert's innovative What-A-Cartoon! program; 48 theatrical length, original character cartoons, made expressly for the Cartoon Network, and designed to find the talent and hits of the new generations. 2 Stupid Dogs spawned creators Genndy Tartakovsky (Dexter's Laboratory and Samurai Jack), Craig McCracken (The Powerpuff Girls and Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends), Miles Thompson, Paul Rudish, and Zac Moncrief. Many of their shorts were imparted with the same strikingly two-dimensional, purposefully cartoony animation style.
     
  19. Greg1

    Greg1 Ness Vet

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    "Bear is driving! How can that be?"

    [​IMG]

    33. Clerks: The Animated Series (2000) - 16 points


    Clerks: The Animated Series (also simply Clerks) is an American cult animated television series based on Kevin Smith's 1994 film debut Clerks. It was developed for television by Smith, Smith's producer Scott Mosier and former Seinfeld writer David Mandel.

    The main characters, Dante Hicks, Randal Graves, Jay and Silent Bob, as well as the setting and basic premise, are taken directly from the movie. The show differs from the movie in many ways, however, due to the additional freedom animation provides, as well as the language and content restrictions that broadcast TV demands. For example, the characters of Jay and Silent Bob were changed from drug dealers to mischief makers (selling fireworks instead of marijuana), and the explicit sexual dialogue in the film (which was enough to initially achieve an NC-17 rating in the U.S.) is drastically toned down. The series also introduced a new villain, Leonardo Leonardo, after whom Leonardo, New Jersey is named, the town in which the series, and the film, takes place. Leonardo was voiced by Alec Baldwin.

    Only two episodes were aired on ABC in 2000 before the series was cancelled. Several factors contributed to the cancellation, including low ratings, the show's not fitting in with ABC's other programming, unsuccessful test-screening to older audiences, and ABC's decision to air the shows out of order. ABC aired the fourth episode first, as opposed to the intended first episode, and then aired the second episode despite the fact that the second episode is the 'flashback' episode, and derives much of its humor from the fact that it flashes back almost exclusively to the first, unaired episode. In fact, the second episode aired without the scene from "Flintstone's List", the fictional RST Video rental that spoofed Schindler's List.

    The show did make it to DVD, and it has proved to be much more popular than the show was when it aired on TV.
     
  20. Greg1

    Greg1 Ness Vet

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    "Ha ha ha. You merely separated my head from my body. A courtesy I will gladly extend to you all, for none of you are leaving here alive."

    [​IMG]

    32. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (2003) - 16 points


    The 2003 animated series deviates from the 1987 - 1996 animated series significantly. While still a Saturday morning cartoon, the show bears more resemblance to the original, "darker and edgier" comics, published by Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird's Mirage Studios. Gone are a cartoony Shredder and his inept mutant/alien associates. Bebop and Rocksteady, Krang, the Technodrome and Dimension X are all absent from this series since they were not in the original comics and were created for the 1987 animated series, and Shredder is much more menacing and threatening than his previous cartoon incarnation. In addition, there is a main plot and several sub-plots running through the series, revealing hints which will develop as the series unfolds. Although many of the episodes are stand-alone, each usually has a key element that relates to the plot as a whole; furthermore, there are frequent two-to-four-episode continuous stories.

    In the 2003 cartoon show, the four Turtles personalities are in someways different from the 1987 cartoon, they reflect the more somber mood of the 2003 cartoon and are an attempt to follow the Mirage comics more closely. All characters are more fleshed-out and more sensitive, and have a stronger family bond. Leonardo is more skillful and meditative than in the 1987 series (where he was slightly serious, but occasionally does silly things whenever his brothers do); episodes of the 2003 series that focus on The Shredder and ninjitsu also focus on Leonardo. Leonardo's strained yet close relationship with Raphael is an important plot element. Raphael is much angrier and more emotional (in the 1987 show, he loves to make jokes and is more friendly), and sometimes fights with Leonardo, but is shown to deeply care about his family and friends on several occasions. When the Turtles pair off, the least likely duos are Leonardo and Michelangelo as one pair, and Donatello and Raphael as the other, due to their drastically different personalities, but the show explores each relationship more with each season. One unique new trait is that major TMNT ally Casey Jones is given a larger supporting role, unlike the original 1987 series where he was just a minor recurring character, and the 2003 series also shows him having some romantic feelings towards the Turtles' other major ally April O'Neil (who also is a supporting character in this series) - just like in the original comic books and the first movie. The original show's catchphrase, "Cowabunga," has been joked about several times (with Raphael telling Michelangelo not to say "cowabunga" anymore). (Even the "Turtle Power" catchphrase has been almost totally left out of the 2003 series)

    In the 2003 TMNT cartoon, as in the original comic, Splinter, the Turtles' sensei and father, is depicted as a rat who has been mutated to a humanoid form, instead of a man who has been mutated to rat form as in the 1987 TMNT cartoon. Baxter Stockman is African American (like he was in the comics) instead of Caucasian, and April is initially his lab assistant and later, the owner of an antique shop, instead of an anchorwoman. She has also been studying Ninjitsu under Splinter, and is now capable of holding her own in a fight. The character Leatherhead, who in the 1987 show was an evil, cajun-sounding mutant alligator with limited intelligence, in the 2003 show is a highly intelligent mutated crocodile whose origin involves the Utroms, prefers peace but becomes violent when provoked, and is considered by the turtles and Splinter to be family.
     

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