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The Official "What do you Recommend?" Thread

Discussion in 'Comic Book Culture' started by Storm, Nov 5, 2003.

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  1. Storm

    Storm Active Member

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    Hiya Guys! It's that time of the year again and you know what that means. Everybody who is into comics will be asking about what issues or graphic novels do you recommend them to get. In the past we have gotten so many threads of the same nature I think it would be more helpful and easier to those who need some insight on what to buy or what to want. So for all of those who have a certain wish list get em out and type what you want (titles, genre, or character) and for those who love to help list the best of the best :) Have fun guys!


    - Storm
     
  2. Catlover

    Catlover C'mon! Let's Dance, Baby!

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    Could anyone recomend some anime style comics. I already know about Batman: Child of Dreams and the X-men issues Kia Asamiya worked on (I would also like to know what TPB I could find these issues in), and the capcom comics. Thanks.
     
  3. Jade_GL

    Jade_GL An Aperture Science Original

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    I got a cute little graphic novel called Death: At Death's Door which was put out by DC/Vertigo just a few months ago. It's manga style (and very well done I might add) and is very cute and funny.

    And I know nothing much about the Sandman comics, and I was able to follow it relatively well. It's worth going to a local bookstore and flipping through it to see if you like it.

    Also, have you checked out the Marvel Mangaverse comics. Though I didn't like some of what they did, I thought their anime inspired reinterpretations of characters were very interesting, especially the Fantastic Four and Spider-man. There should be relatively cheap issues at the comics shop and they put out three trades. Marvel Mangaverse 1 and 2, and the Marvel Mangaverse Spider-man trade.

    And Marvel did a Pheonix one as well that was a 3 issue mini. Only problem with that was that it turned into a MAX title because of the scantily clad women in it. I thought it was cool looking, but I never got that into it. However, your tastes may be vastly different and you may dig this one too, so I would look for that, unless of course the whole scantily clad women thing bothers you. :D j/k

    I'll see if I can find anything else that may fit the bill. I hope that helps somewhat. It's all I can come up with right now. :D:D:D
     
  4. Bubblegum Girl

    Bubblegum Girl Magic User Wannabe

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    For those who like dark humor books I recommend:
    • Lenore
    • SQUEE!
    • Nightmares & Fairy Tales
    • Filler Bunny
    • I Feel Sick
    I would also recommend Marvel Mangaverse, FLCL, Hsu & Chan, and Young Justice because I read those books and I really liked them.
     
  5. Catlover

    Catlover C'mon! Let's Dance, Baby!

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    Thanks Jade_GL, I'll see if my local Boarders has some of those. And I'll just have to get Pheonix off of eBay. I love scantily clad women! :D :anime:
     
  6. Cyber E.

    Cyber E. Active Member

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    Two words.

    The. Flash.

    Geoff Johns has been on this book for the longest time, and [personally] the writing was only diminished from brilliant to good around issue #200. Johns knows how to write Flash, and he knows how to work with his friends and family and especially his rogues gallery. His writing for 99% always at the top of his game, and when Kolins was doing art for the book, it was just magnificent.

    After issue #200, when Kolins left and a MAJOR event occurred in the book, the writing started to become more darker and not what I used to love about this book. Its still great, and Dose is a sub par artist, but there isn't a thing that can beat the Johns/Kolins days. Its perfect for anyone who needs a good action fix.
     
  7. Jade_GL

    Jade_GL An Aperture Science Original

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    Jade_GL's Crazy Insane *Read it or Weep* List

    Ongoing Series

    • Catwoman - one of the best written comics out there, and the art is always top notch. There is a trade that has the first issues and a great lead in is Selina's Big Score, which can be found in soft or hard cover.
    • Fables - Amazing comic. This is one of Vertigo's best titles. I like how they take the story book characters we know and twist them in new and interesting ways.
    • JSA - Best team book out there. This book is always near perfect in writing, art, covers, everything. Almost every storyline so far can be found in a trade.
    • New Mutants - Ok, a lot of people don't like this, but as someone who didn't read the original New Mutants, this is an interesting read. Again, I like the art and writing. It's not ground shaking, just interesting.

    I could write out all the TPBs I reccomend to people, but it would be way too much to write out here.

    However, I would seriously tell every comic fan to get The Greatest Superman Stories Ever Told, The Greatest Batman Stories Ever Told 1 + 2, and The Greatest Joker Stories Ever Told. These can be found relatively cheap (I got them on ebay for 10 each, and one at a comic con for 5) and they have reprints of old classic comics. They're very cool and they may not be as extensive as an Archive Edition, but they cover a lot of ground and really have some great stories. So I would highly reccomend these to anyone.
     
  8. Antiyonder

    Antiyonder Amalgam Universe Overlord
    Staff Member Moderator

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    Ok.

    Spider-Girl: I know the Spider-Man titles are getting better, but Spider-Girl is still a title worth the money. It's faithful to the Marvel Universe Continuity (at least the stories from 1960's to 1998) without being hard to get into. Good character development for the supporting cast. The main female character isn't treated like a sex object. This is a comic all ages cn enjoy. Spider-Man fans will also like this series for the following reasons:

    Baby May was returned to her parents.

    Ben Reilly is fondly remembered (Read #44 for a good example).

    Aunt May's Death from The Amazing Spider-Man #400 is perserved here.


    Besides, this title could use more support.
     
  9. Fernus

    Fernus Abraham Sapien

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    JLA titles:

    Trail By Fire - I'd get the graphic novel when it comes out
    Tower of Babel - I'm not a big fan of it, but it reminded me of JLA: Year One, which I also recommend.
    Terror Incognita - Still, in my opinion, one of the best current JLA saga they've had.


    Justice League Adventures:

    They slipped there for a while, for a long while actually, but I'm starting to enjoy them more and more as they go. I recomend #10 and #20 before anything else, since they're the cream of the crop.


    Though they're not that easy to find, I recomend the cancelled Martian Manhunter series (John Ostrander) Even though it didn't last past 50 some plus issues, I enjoyed everyone issue I got from it. From this series, I recomend before anything else issues #3-9, the Malefic Saga.
     
  10. Jade_GL

    Jade_GL An Aperture Science Original

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    MM ran 36 issues. Plus 0, 1,00,00,000, and specials. Probably 40 or so in all. :)

    It's pretty easy to find back issues, at least at my comic store. But some issues are very hard to find. I looked everywhere for 20 and 30 and it took a long time. Anyway, I would recommend that too if you can find it.

    Good choice Dr. Destiny. :D
     
  11. Eddie G.

    Eddie G. Former Wolf/Writer.

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    Supreme Power is very cool.
     
  12. Weibart

    Weibart Intercept Now!
    Reporter

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    I highly recommend darwyn cooke:
    if you're a batman fan, read Batman : Ego, written and drawn by him, it's a great story. he worked on the animated series for a while, so his style is familiar but unique unto itself. selina's big score is a great heist story, looking at selina kyle from a different and very cool perspective.
     
  13. Samhaine

    Samhaine Time To Relax

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    Ok, I'll bite.

    Catwoman - Brubaker writing a great crime comic. The 'animated' style will be missed, but this is one of the best and most unpredictable series out there.

    Gotham Central - COPS in Gotham. But good. It's got Brubaker and Rucka, so you know it's got to be good. Lark's art is magnificent. If you're not reading this book, then you are missing out on a classic in the making.

    Fables - I will agree, this is really great. I just made the decision to go to trade format, though, mainly because I think it would read better all at once. That way, it's more storybook-like.

    Lucifer - I'll admit, it sounds bad, given that the title character is Satan himself, but it's by no means an 'evil' or 'gothic' book (not that there's anything wrong with them - I loved Squee and JTHM). It's an epic story. I'd probably recommend the trades at this point, as it's fairly involved where it is right now. But you know the story will have an ending, so it's not going to burn out or run out of ideas and keep meandering on. Plus, it's got some of the best artists out there. Superb.

    Batman Adventures - The best this book has been in a long time. It's really come a long way from the Peterson days, and I'm truly happy. Good, simple (but not simplistic) stories about the Dark Knight. It's much darker than previous series as well, giving it an edge we sometimes don't even see i the core-books (excluding the 100 Batmans storyline, natch).

    Dork Tower and Nodwick - I'm clumping these two together, not really sure why. DT is a book about gamers/comic fanboys and their lives. Is hilarious, and is consistently on the top of the pile when it comes out. Nodwick is a book about a group of fantasy adventurers and their hijinks. It's funny, but looking back, it's had a fairly large storyline as well. And also, even though it's a fantasy book, a lot of the jokes are 21st century-based. (Ex, there was an issue that dealt with an 'upgrade' in the magic system, which was riff on Windows and it's constant upgrades).

    Deadenders - Cancelled far too early, this is a story about a post-apocalyptic teenagers dealing with life. I know, yet another post-apocalyptic future. But it's about the characters, not the setting, and it was really a sad day when this series was cancelled. It's also by Brubaker (a trend here?) and was only 16 issues. It should be pretty easy to track down.

    Don't forget to start reading The Maxx. The first trade is out, with more to come. Brilliant stuff.

    If I can think of anything else, I'll be sure to post.
     
  14. Ed Liu

    Ed Liu That's 'Cause I ATE IT!!!
    Staff Member Moderator Reporter

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    Howdy,

    I'm going to go offbeat with my recommendations:

    - Courtney Crumrin and the Night Things. The witty and gorgeously drawn adventures of Harry Potter's smart-aleck younger sister. Ted Naifeh's artwork is sweetly menacing, Courtney herself is delightfully misanthropic, and the color Black demonstrates an incredible dynamic range in the artwork. The second TPB (Courtney Crumrin and the Coven of Mystics) isn't quite as good (a series of delightful vignettes that doesn't quite cohere 100% as a story), but is still worth seeking out. I've seen these all over at Borders & Barnes & Noble, so it shouldn't be too hard to find.

    - Epicurus the Sage. Recently re-released by DC to coincide with The Maxx reprints, this showcases some of Sam Kieth's earliest artwork. I'm almost reluctant to say what the thing is about, fearing that the wacky mythological-inspired adventures of a misunderstood Greek philosopher isn't the kind of thing most people want to experiment with. Try it anyway.

    - Maria's Wedding. Nunzio DeFillipis and Christina Weir didn't hit the scene with New Mutants. Their back-catalog of stuff for Oni Press is all really good, solid stuff (leading up to the New Mutants gig, after all), but this slim TPB is one of my favorites. A big family drama that swings between deeply touching, hilariously funny, and heartbreaking -- just like most weddings.

    -- Ed/Ace
     
  15. Cogliostro

    Cogliostro Finish it...

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    Guns, Drugs and Monsters: A Cal McDonald Mystery by Steve Niles - This is the second novel like book written by Niles with his character Cal McDonald who has made a career helping and hunting the dark creatures that haunt the world and has made as many friends as he has enemies. Among the docile ghouls of the city he is a friend. But to most, those who prey on innocent human lives, Cal is a sworn enemy.

    "To me, Cal McDonald is the logical progression of the hard-boiled detective," commented series writer Niles. "Instead of the 40's hard drinking tough guy, Cal is a hard, self-medicating guy with enough personal and emotional problems to fill a file cabinet. Oh, and there are monsters."

    Steve Niles, the hardboiled hipster of the horror set, proves that his exceptional first novel, SAVAGE MEMBRANE, wasn’t just a fluke. Niles, already well-known to fans for his intense comic book writing, presents a book that exists somewhere between the frames of a Bogart flick…but with more creatures of the night. Think of it as a more violent KEY LARGO, if KEY LARGO featured a soundtrack by Rob Zombie.

    GUNS, DRUGS AND MONSTERS picks up the story of Cal MacDonald, the private eye/monster hunter from SAVAGE MEMBRANE. And this is just not Cal’s day. First he’s held hostage by a voodoo priest with an axe to grind, then he gets evicted.


    But things really turn bad when Cal’s old friend, and monster hunting colleague drops by…well, at least his head drops by. The head, still alive despite its disembodiment, shows up in the mail, begging Cal to help him find his body. Apparently some Satanists in California’s San Fernando Valley have found a way to separate people’s living heads from their living bodies; and Cal’s buddy wants to get his torso back before the Satanists do who knows what with it.


    Having little left for himself in his native DC, Cal decides to relocate to the Los Angeles area for good. But Cal, who is a hard man to shock, is nonetheless soon shocked by the sheer volume of creeps and ghouls that call LA home.


    In the novel Niles is able to walk the line between action and sarcastic comedy. Cal’s fish-out-of-water observations on the nature of Los Angeles are sure to be appreciated by anyone who’s spent anytime in the city. Such comments were undoubtedly informed by the writer’s personal move to LA from the East. But those not familiar with La-la land will still find the novel compelling, if only because of the stomach-turning twists the excellent horror/mystery takes.


    Just as tightly plotted as the first novel, Niles’ less-is-more writing style employs a terse economy of words to build tension and deliver real thrills.
    review by Cinescape.

    If none of that has grabbed your attenion or got you interested then how about reading the first chapter for FREE online? What do you got to lose? Nothing...so take a quick look here for the first chapter or Guns, Drugs and Monsters. Just scroll down past the first page which is just a cover art page to the first chapter then if you need to see the text better zoom in with the magnifying glass. I would be interested in hearing what those of you who do read the first chapter, what you thought about it.

    Thanks for your time.
     
  16. Mattashell

    Mattashell Before punk,there were NUGGETS

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    I'll give it a try:

    Barefoot Gen: The four-part autobiographical manga by Keiji Nakazawa about his childhood experience surviving the explosion in Hiroshima is finally back in print. I have difficulty understanding why it’s as obscure as it is. It’s social weight is tremendous, and it should be considered a must read. I encourage you all to seek it out.

    Maus: Art Spiegelman's two-part holocaust opus is one of the most famous graphic novels of all time, and makes a great companion to Barefoot Gen. While Barefoot Gen is an attempt by a survivor to relate to his experience, Maus is an attempt by a young man who's lived a sheltered, American lifestyle to relate to the experiences of a survivor, his father, which proves a difficult task.

    Like a Velvet Glove Cast in Iron: (Recommended for mature readers) This surreal tale by Daniel Clowes, which was originally chronicled in the pages of 8-Ball (now in graphic novel form) is about a man who sees his estranged wife in a pornographic film, that isn't quite pornographic. He goes looking for her and winds up in the most bizarre misadventure since that English girl followed a rabbit into the woods, featuring secret societies, a feminist serial killer's cult, and an unlikely deity's spawn. From the creator of Ghost World.

    The Maxx: Speaking of surreal, I must recommend my favorite work of all time by Sam Kieth with help from Bill Messner-Loebs. Since it's already been mentioned up here, all I'll say is DC is (at a snail's pace) re-releasing the entire run in TPB form. Volume 1, 2 & 3 are out now, so what are you waiting for, go pick them up, and while your at it grab anything else you see with Kieth's name on it.

    Daredevil Visionaries: Frank Miller Volume 2: This is what Daredevil is all about. One of the greatest graphic yarns ever spun, its a defining chapter in the Marvel mythos. If you haven’t read it, do so.

    Arrowsmith: This fantasy-adventure tale about an alternate WWI in a world of magic and myth is completely submersive. It draws you into its world, from its alternate takes on small-town Americana and old time New York to the battlefields of Europe - from wide eyed idealistic visions of glory to the harsh reality of war. Written by Kurt Busiek, art by Carlos Pacheco.

    The Fantastic Four: Unstable Molecules: don't be thrown be the FF name on the cover. This tale is a slice on Americana about suburban lifestyles on Long Island. It shimmers with a sad beauty, yet its tongue remains firmly planted in its cheek. It also has a sort of "mockumentary" feel to it erroneously claiming that it, as well as Stan & Jack's FF run, is based on a true story. By James Sturm and Guy Davis.

    My last three recommendations on this list are books nearly every comic-reader has read, however just in case, here are the three most famous all time classics of comic publishing history.

    Watchmen: There really isn't anything I've read by Alan Moore that I wouldn't recommend (so as I said about Sam Kieth, go out and buy anything with Moore's name on it. Hurry!), but most agree with me in saying this is his finest work. Based on the golden-age character stable of Charlton comics (with names and faces changed by request of DC) this apocalyptic adventure twists and turns on the most captivating graphic roller-coaster ride of all time. Read it, then read it again, and then again. Art by Dave Gibbons.

    Batman: The Dark Knight Returns: Frank Millers vision of the end of Batman's career re-defined the character and brought us into a new age of comics. Avoid the unnecessary sequel, The Dark Knight Strikes Again.

    Kingdom Come: In which it's Superman's turn to come out of retirement relies on similar themes as those listed above, though it's not groundbreaking. It is unique though for its rich, religious undertones and life-like art, and it does make a great companion to Watchmen and The Dark Knight Returns. Scripted by Mark Waid (Fantastic Four) and painted by Alex Ross (Mythology).
     
    #16 Mattashell, Nov 7, 2003
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 24, 2004
  17. sKorpia

    sKorpia Sweet Little Owl

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    Fables. I'm getting them as TPBs and it's been fantastic so far. A wonderful look at post-"Happily Ever After" with a submerged epic feel.

    Watchmen. Read it once. Then read it twice. Then read it again.

    American Splendor. For those who enjoy making little observations about life, Harvey Pekar is your man. Mini-essays on the minor episodes and thoughts that make up life, accompanied by some fantastic art (especially Gerry Shamray and S. Cavey).

    Arkham Asylum: Living Hell. One heck of a tale that introduces some deliciously disturbing new criminals such as Doodlebug and Humpty Dumpty. More people should read this.

    Kingdom Come. An unblinking "what if" tale with Alex Ross artwork. Honestly, there isn't much more you could ask for.

    Y:The Last Man. Another one I'm getting as TPBs. Interesting premise. While the title character is male, the exploration of females has been gratifying mostly because women are not restricted to archtypes.

    For people interested in manga, I've heard that Great Teacher Onizuka is amazing. I'm planning on picking it up some time, especially since I enjoyed the series.
     
  18. Mattashell

    Mattashell Before punk,there were NUGGETS

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    Hi, I'd like to step back in since I've noticed that I focused my list on an "all-time" perspective, but didn't mention what I recommend that's out right now. So here's my "current monthly" recommendation.

    Green Arrow: Kevin Smith's 15 issue run that launched this title got me highly attatched to the character. But since his departure, one writer after another continued to sink this title deeper and deeper into a hole of lameness. I thought it was hopeless and was about to give up on it, untill the last person I would have expected capable turned it around. Judd Winick, who's dismal run on Green Lantern had him on my hate-list, proves that sometimes bad writing just means a writer's on the wrong book, because Green Arrow is back, and he is with a vengeance. Art by Phil Hester.
     
    #18 Mattashell, Nov 8, 2003
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 17, 2004
  19. Budman

    Budman Member

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    Brian Bendis' Daredevil, Mark Waid's Fantastic Four, Dan Jugen's Thor, and Ed Brubaker's Batman/Alan Scott team-up in Detective have all been highlights of 2003.
     
  20. wrenchien

    wrenchien Active Member

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    i'd recommend NEVER, EVER picking up any archie comics. instead, pick up spawn, pick the spawn comics out of the rack, every single one, of them, carry them enmasse to the cash register, then when they're paid for kick them comics out of the store with your boot and yell 'hey kids free comics'. then repeat with the batman ones. then the superman ones. then the spiderman ones. maybe pay for, then chuck out a few wizard magazines.

    if the cops hadnt come by to question your behavior, go for a couple of the big o mangas, pay for and give to the kids outside, then run like hell after jumpin over the kids and the comics they're grateful for. and then, afterwards, go on to the next mall in a different city.

    you will make a lot of kids very happy buying them comics for free so they can enjoy reading. even if the cops will have apbs on you in multiple states after a few months of this practice. but don't stop there! there's lots of mexican bookstores with comics in them you've got to do that for. and when you go for the comics, hit the ones about the vulture with the cap, they're teh awesome.

    post #1333 . only 333 to go and that will be one heck of a post :confused: :eek: :evil: :rolleyes:
     
    #20 wrenchien, Nov 11, 2003
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 11, 2003
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