The Official "So What Do You Recommend?" Thread (Vol. 3)

Discussion in 'Comic Book Culture' started by wonderfly, Jan 18, 2011.

  1. Michael24

    Michael24 Moderator
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    What are some good Batman detective stories? Ones that really play up the detective aspect of him? Whether larger story lines or just single issue plots, well-known or not. Heading to the comic shop tomorrow and only getting a couple new releases, so I wouldn't mind hitting up the back issue bins looking for anything that's recommended. (If made in time. If not, there's always next Wednesday. :) )
     
  2. Ed Liu

    Ed Liu Frog of Thunder
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    Definitely seek out Detective Comics Annual #2 from 1989. The main story isn't about Batman as much as it's about Bruce Wayne learning how to be Batman from Harvey Harris, a detective Bruce seeks out during his "wander the world training" phase. One of the few exceptions to my "Origin Stories Suck" rule because it's less an origin story and more a terrific story that happens to be set in a character's early days.

    There's also Detective Comics #572 from 1987, which was a special anniversary issue that has Batman teaming up with the Elongated Man and Slam Bradley to stop...uh...something. It's been a while since I read it. It's got a lot of detectives in it, though in all honesty I don't think it's quite a "detective" story in the usual sense.
     
  3. Richv1

    Richv1 Member

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    [​IMG]
    Title: She Is...Silkie
    Publisher: Seajay Ventures and CE Publishing
    Co-Creators/Co-Writers: Jonathan Gilbert/Laura Wright aks Michelle DeVarennes
    Artist/Cocer Artist: Seppo Makinen
    Letterers: David Vance/Stan Wong
    Co-Story Editors: Nathon Massengill/Dave A. Law
    Editorial Consultant: Llyod Smith
    Production: Mike Rickaby
    Price: $ 5.00 US digital, $ 9.95 US printed
    Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    Websites: www.graphicly.com/publishers
    www.redlionpublications.blogspot.ca/
    www.cepublishing.wetpaint.com/page/COMICS
    Comments: "Chapter One: Of Myth and Reality" On this Island there is a legend of Silkies. They are underwater creatures that you should be careful of according to the local legends.
    A reporter is investigating the legend. The reporter ends up joining a hunt for the Silkie.
    The story is accompanied by some well drawn scenes of the local and people. The story is filled with a lot of build up and suspense. The Silkie turns out to be more than just a legend.
    "Chapter Two: Obsession" Barry the reporter is the main character. Heather a beautiful young woman plays a good part to as she helps Barry. The town is unsure what to do with the Silkie it has caught. Barry we see is thinking a lot about this Silkie.
    Barry and Heather start working together and now they have a common goal.
    The art really does bring this comic to life.
    The Silkie this were-seal creature does not talk at first or do much. Having her do so creates a sense of mystery about her. Is she good or bad? Or just a creature of nature?
    "Chapter Three: Storm Warning" Barry heads out on his own to find the Silkie. The water is choppy, a storm in brewing. Barry`s friendship towards the Silkie pays off for him. When she finds him at sea.
    The Silkie is a thing of beauty. Her curves are well drawn. Plus she is fully nude but her long hair hides her sexual areas.
    Barry while in the home of the Silkie learns of her nature. It is wonderful to see the story unfold. As you read more you are drawn more into the story.
    "Chapter Four: Revelations" This chapter has Heather shown a lot more sexy in the art. Her concern for Barry is more noticable as well.
    Barry continues to learn more about the Silkie. She seems so kind and sweet and caring.
    "Chapter Five: Passions"The search for the Silkie goes on. Meanwhile Barry and the Silkie become very close.
    Also Heather meets a man who washed up on shore with no memory. Whats his story?
    Evans a vengeful hate filled man finds Barry and the Silkie. His reaction is not calm or nice. The Silkie is so peaceful she deserves to be left in peace.
    "Chapter Six: What Price Vengeance?" Mr. Evans still wants revenge for the death of his son which he blames on the Silkie.
    The artwork continues to be very detailed.
    Things are building and moving faster. All the players are gathering. Things play out as they most often do when humans are involved, with violence.
    Things do turn out ending as most endings do not entirely happy but not entirely sad.
    The story keeps you focused on it and the art is a visual delight.

    Richard Vasseur/Jazma VP www.jazmaonlline.com
     
  4. HEATXZ

    HEATXZ Duck Knght

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    I'm looking for some recommendations
    I'm looking for Comics(Marvel,DC,Image,or etc) that are very funny(Besides Deadpool i have lots of his comics) and with action plus artwork were characters look more cartoon/anime style like Gurihiru,Humberto Ramos,and Ed McGuinness

    Also I'm looking for comics that have Plasticman in the Justice League
     
  5. Ed Liu

    Ed Liu Frog of Thunder
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    For the first, you want Atomic Robo. Right now. Grab any TPB and start reading -- each one is built to be a starting point and none of them rely heavily on anything before or after for anything except the occasional in-joke or casual reference.

    For the second, you can hit the JLA run that started with Grant Morrison and ran through Joe Kelly's tenure. Plastic Man joined after the "Rock of Ages" storyline, as I recall (vol 3?), and appeared semi-regularly throughout. You want to start from the beginning, though -- vols 1 and 2 are pretty flat-out awesome, and "Rock of Ages" is stupendous. There's a story in there involving a Batman/Plastic Man teamup that reveals bits about Plas' past history which a lot of people don't like but which I thought was pretty enjoyable. Then again, I'm one of the very few who felt that way about Joe Kelly's run in general.

    I also thought Kyle Baker's Plastic Man run was unjustly underrecognized, and it will also fit your request for cartoony humor books, since it's entirely unserious. So, of course, senior management never really supported it and audiences ignored it, and it was euthanized after about a dozen issues.
     
  6. ryandcow

    ryandcow Active Member

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    As for funny comics I highly recommend Giffen and Dematteis' Run on Justice League international as well as 2 mini's by them called "Formerly Known as the Justice League" and "I Can't Belive it's not the Justice League". More of stuff in that vein can be found in their run on Booster Gold.
    Secret Six from DC as well has a lot of funny moments but is not a comedy book.
    From the Marvel side, Dan Slott's "Great Lakes Avengers: Misassembled"
    Image, I guess there's Tales from the Bully Pulpit, and from Dark Horse there's Axe Cop: Bad Guy Earth.



    Also, I'm wondering if Tom Strong is as good as Promethea and Top 10.
    I know it's a lot different but in overall enjoyability is it as good?
     
  7. animewolf17

    animewolf17 Member

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    Starting to read comics more consistently and want to catch up with some of the new Batman comics should I go with the Detective Comics vol.1 or Batman vol. 1 The Court of Owls?
     
  8. rggkjg1

    rggkjg1 Batman v Superman

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    i think i can safely speak for everyone here and say go with batman: the court of owls and avoid detective comics vol 1.
     
  9. Shawn Hopkins

    Shawn Hopkins TZ Member of the Year 2013

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    If you already like Deadpool, I'm going to steer you to Nextwave. Same kind of over the top violence and weirdness, but even funnier. There's even a slight anime influence to the art.

    [​IMG]

    In general, the funniest comic books ever are:

    Ambush Bug: meta commentary on comics mixed with general weirdness and pathos, a really over the top pathetic main character. Ambush Bug Summer Special is maybe my second favorite comic ever.
    Justice League International: As mentioned earlier. The Justice League Antarctica annual is my favorite comic ever, a completely absurd story about supervillains being set up as a Justice League branch in Antarctica to get them out of the way. And how that is a terrible idea.
    The Heckler: one of Keith Giffen's lesser lights, but maybe the most extreme and undiluted version of the type of humor he does. Stars a crazy Bugs Bunny influenced character, has some of the funniest lines in any comic ever.
    Hate: Peter Bagge's exploration of Seattle slackerdom. A horrible main character that's still somehow endearing.
    Joe Matt's Peepshow: Autobiographical comics from a guy with some really nutty quirks.
    Sam and Max: Super cool, super weird comics about a big dawg and a rabbity thing that like to shoot people.
    The Tick: Superheroes would have to be crazy, right? This just takes that literally. One of the funniest comics on this list, no contest.
    Howard the Duck: The funniest and most cynical comic Marvel ever published.
    Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers: With a quick look this might just seem like a hippy/drug comic, and it is, but it also sets up some of the funniest situations and characters ever seen in comics.
    Dork: Evan Dorkin is probably best known for his hyper-violent Milk and Cheese strips, but these collections are funnier and more personal. I love the Eltingville Club stories, a blisteringly accurate takedown of nerddom.
    The Pro: So what if a prostitute became a superhero. It would be gross, but also hilarious.
    Preacher part of the time: Preacher goes for the grotesque. Sometime it's grotesquely violent. Sometimes it's grotesquely hilarious.
    Barry Ween Boy Genius, when it's not be damned heartbreaking: It's like Jimmy Neutron or Dexter's Lab, but way better and with more swearing.
    Scott Pilgrim: One of the funniest comics ever published. Creator has a good ear for funny dialogue.
    Hitman. Not funny all the way through, it actually gets grim by the end, but the Zombie Night At the Gotham Aquarium arc is priceless.
    Bizarro Comics collections from DC. Collections of indy comics creators working on the weirder fringes of the DCU.
    Some of the Strange Tales collections from Marvel. Ditto, although all the stories aren't humorous.
    The Marvel Graphic Novel Hulk and Thing: The Big Change. The dumb green Hulk has never done anything funnier than the things he does in this issue, especially one specific thing.
    Quantum and Woody, especially the Goat special. Christopher Priest's usually brings a bitter, funny brew to his superhero comics, but here he focuses on it full stop and it's hilarious.
    She Hulk, especially Dan Slott's version. She Hulk, like Deadpool, understands she is a comic book character and hilariously exploits that in Sensational She Hulk. The more recent series are more wacky looks at superhuman law.
    Great Lakes Avengers books. Loveable losers, we're talking using a compact car as a "quinjet" here, who you want to see win.
    Flaming Carrot. So surreal and strange you have to laugh or go nuts.

    I am a huge fan of Archie and other "kids" comics, but won't pretend that these are generally gut-bustingly funny. Some of the Archies have their moments, though, especially Jughead stories and stories that focus on Reggie.
     
  10. GWOtaku

    GWOtaku Moderator
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    I am hunting for good science fiction in a bid to see if there's stuff out there in U.S. comics at all comparable to some of the excellent stuff I've found in manga. I'm partial to space opera and thoughtful and futuristic stuff like Ghost in the Shell, but original stuff of almost any genre I'll at least consider. My first step was to search through comixology & for the most part, I found the selection wanting. So I'm branching out the search a bit.

    What I'm generally not looking for:
    • Marvel & DC superhero stuff that just happens to have SF trappings (so no X-Men just because the Shi'ar are involved)
    • Crossovers (Star Trek and Dr. Who?!)
    • Adaptations of famous novels or super popular franchises (Ender's Game, Voltron, etc), unless it's really good
    Things I've been recommended so far: Atomic Robo and Saga.
     
  11. Ed Liu

    Ed Liu Frog of Thunder
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    Two sci-fi series that jump out at me now in addition to the ones you've mentioned:

    - Xenozoic Tales. The foundation for the Cadillacs & Dinosaurs cartoon, and if you add "Babes & Beefcake," I think you pretty much nail down what the series is about. The art is probably far, far better than the story, but the story's not bad and the art is gobsmackingly gorgeous. Flesk just released a one-volume edition.

    - Grease Monkey: Really more of a coming-of-age tale in a sci-fi setting, except that the kid's wise mentor is the simian mechanic for a squadron of outer space babe fighter pilots. If you need very much more than that for you to give it a try, I have to question your judgment for things that are awesome, but the graphic novel is wildly great fun, wonderfully written, and beautifully, cartoon-ily drawn.
     
  12. Cortez2301

    Cortez2301 Active Member

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    How should I enter the world and mythology of Marvel Comics?

    I am familiar with many characters from Marvel but I have read so few of their comics. Now whether its spiderman, punisher, fantastic 4, x-men, Cable, ghost rider or deadpool,what would YOUR recommendations be as to familiarize myself with each (or most) of the characters and get into the mythos, the various storylines and the key events of Marvel comics that make them so special?

    I understand fully that this is no easy task and is alot to ask, but even if someone starts me off by slowly recommending some issues/graphic novels to begin my venture into the world, that would be grand.


    I thank anyone who has the patience to help me out in advance and I eagerly anticipate your suggestions.
     
  13. GWOtaku

    GWOtaku Moderator
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    I pretty much started focusing on who appealed to me most (Captain America FTW). If there's no standout case for you though, then I'd imagine a team book like Avengers or X-Men would be smart.

    The new Captain Marvel book looks like it could be pretty solid (Carol Danvers, not Billy Batson from DC comics...long and weird story). So far they've basically (re)introduced the character and are poised to start really telling stories with issue #2.

    Marvel did do this "point one" series of books last year with the intent of getting new readers on board with stories that were supposed to both introduce things and flow into whatever current storylines were going on at the time. They might help you sort out your interests.

    Other people are way better equipped to recommend storylines or big events. If you're a Joss Whedon fan, you shouldn't miss his run on Astonishing X-Men.
     
  14. King9

    King9 Embraced One

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    ^ GWO gives good advice. I recommend picking a hero or story you like most and starting with its seminal works. As you read those you'll see names, places, and events that will be a simple Google or wiki search away. For example I started reading Swamp Thing (DC, I kow) at a friends request. I didn't know anything about it, but as I read it I started to kind of 'get the flow' of the series and the characters around it.

    I'd say start with what interests you and dive in. It can be hard at first (with so many characters and events going on) but eventually you'll get a grasp on the universe as a whole. I've never read any 'core' Marvel or DC books, but I could vaguely explain the histories of the universes from the fringe series that I have read.

    As for particular stories the current Venom series is verrrry good. Also I've heard great things about the new Daredevil series which just put out its first trade.
     
  15. Jin Kazama

    Jin Kazama Hawkguy
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    Since this is about recommending, I'm merging it with that thread.
     
  16. Cortez2301

    Cortez2301 Active Member

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    Thank you very much guys. I was debating myself whether I should go back to the 60s and read those early spider-man comics. But like most comic books, I don't think good writing (mainly dialogue) would really surface until the 80s (someone correct me if I'm wrong). So I think I'll try and check out daredevil first, and maybe perhaps spider-man and x-men. Not sure, but will give the stuff you guys recommended a look.
     
  17. wonderfly

    wonderfly Shaking things up a bit
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    Sorry for the delayed response, I couldn't think of anything, but then it struck me: There is some Marvel & DC stuff that I consider Sci-Fi/Space Opera, but I didn't think to include it as all Marvel & DC stuff have roots in superhero trappings. But these have transcended being superhero titles, and so here's what "Space Opera" comics that come to mind for me:

    Legion of Super-Heroes: It's set 1,000 years in the future, in which there's a "Federation" group of worlds (called the "United Planets"), and it stars a group of teenagers who are inspired by the superhero mythology of the 20th century to form a superhero army for the universe!

    For a good intro (if you enjoy Silver Age material) I recommend Legion of Super-Heroes: 1,050 Years of the Future. It has many of the highlights of the Silver Age.

    From there, both this website and this website recommend the best Legion storylines from throughout the years ("The Great Darkness Saga" is always recommended - it's the Legion's "Dark Phoenix Saga")

    On the Marvel side of things, there is a whole branch of Marvel called the "Marvel Cosmic" line. While it was started in the late '60's/early '70's with titles like Captain Marvel and Silver Surfer (and the "Kree/Skrull War" in the pages of Avengers), it came into prominence in the early '90's with Guardians of the Galaxy and the whole Thanos saga, found in the "Infinity Gauntlet" storyline (followed by the rather pointless "Infinity Crusade" and "Infinity War" mess).

    But I really recommend just getting into the Cosmic storylines from 2004 onward:

    The "Annihilation" storylines (and their sequels). These storylines they don't involve Earth, they're truly Space Opera, and they're just awesome reads.

    Written by Keith Griffen, Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning, the "Annihilation" saga-line runs from 2004 to 2010, and the stories include:

    Drax the Destroyer #1-4 (it's a prologue to the renewed interest in the Marvel Cosmic line)
    Annihilation Books 1 thru 3
    Annihilation: Conquest Books 1 and 2
    By this point, Marvel greenlighted some ongoing series, including Nova (which lasted 6 TPB volumes) and Guardians of the Galaxy (which lasted 4 volumes).
    Then came War of Kings (spinoff TPB's include "War of Kings: Warriors" and "Road to War of Kings", and I know it's X-Men, but I do recommend reading Rise & Fall of the Shi'Ar Empire)
    then came Realm of Kings
    and finally, it all ends with The Thanos Imperative.

    I link to the collected editions, but you may prefer to buy the individual issues, or read them all digitallly (just offering alternatives).

    This message board has various fans providing complete lists of what all to read, if you like following the individual issues (see page 3 of the thread for a lengthy list).

    I hope that helps!
     
  18. GWOtaku

    GWOtaku Moderator
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    Pondering Man of Steel vs. Superman: Birthright in a Comixology sale. Thoughts?

    (open to other suggestions also)
     
  19. Ed Liu

    Ed Liu Frog of Thunder
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    I think both are more than serviceable as Superman origin stories to get you up to speed on who he is and how he came to be. Byrne's Man of Steel is a bit more dated in terms of the look and the storytelling style -- it's very much a book of the 80's as Frank Miller and Alan Moore were rewriting the book on how you did these things. Doesn't make it a bad book by any means (I'd say the same of George Perez's Wonder Woman reboot from about the same time), but it's something to be aware of. There are some leaps of logic and plot twists that barely pass a basic smell test with the kind of thought that goes into these things today.

    Birthright is more up-to-date in a number of ways, but it's mostly covering the same ground in a bit more detail. There's also a plot twist near the end that I don't much care for, but some think it's pretty cool. I remember it being quite enjoyable right up to that point, though.

    Honestly, all the origin I think Superman needs is that 4-panel, 8-word page kicking off All-Star Superman, mostly because Superman is a "how"-type origin story rather than a "why" type origin story. I think you get a lot more mileage out of Superman if you use the origin to explain why he can do what he does, and then spend your stories having him do it, rather than looking back and adding an ever-increasing amount of Kryptonian elements in there (All-Star Superman being the prime example of that).
     
  20. rggkjg1

    rggkjg1 Batman v Superman

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    How much are you looking to spend? If you're down for Man of Steel AND Birthright, but are looking to spend a little more, I'll post my suggestions from what's being offered.
     

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