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The 79 Redrawn Looney Tunes Cartoons (1990 and Older Airings)

Discussion in 'Back To The Inkwell - Classic Cartoons Discussion' started by ClassicTVMan1981, May 28, 2012.

  1. ClassicTVMan1981

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    Does anyone remember when these 79 redrawn LT shorts (these are of the B&W catalog from 1935-43) were given the newer 1956-style opening and closing titles? Some sources say it was around 1983.

    These 79 shorts were originally struck in South Korea in 1967 (then governed by the infamous Park Chung-hee!), utilizing the original B&W source prints as a guideline for colorization. Until around 1980, these prints utilized the 2nd half of the opening title theme specific to that cartoon, over the 1967-69 W7 opening logo.

    With the 1980 prints, we see first the 1956 Looney Tunes opening rings/WB shield logo (as before, underscored by the 2nd half of the cartoon's original opening music), then it cuts to the redrawn title card (and may or may not be specific to the cartoon, as with the original 1967-68 prints), and then the redrawn credits. The closing logo is the 1956 Looney Tunes closing logo (which then dissolves into the early '70s "Distributed by Warner Bros." notice), set to the original BGM. The second screen was removed in the mid-late '80s.

    There is but one cartoon among this bunch that deserves a special mention: the 1936 Tex Avery short, The Village Smithy.

    At one time after 1995, Nickelodeon aired a version of the 1980 print of the 1936 short, but with a new copyright notice chyroned on the 1956 title card that reads "COPYRIGHT © MCMLXVIII WARNER BROS.-SEVEN ARTS, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED"). This print was probably another placeholder print until the actual 1995 computer colorized version first aired.

    Between 1980 and 1995, though, this short had a redrawn 1936-style opening title (with the WB shield already in place), followed by the 1939 Looney Tunes series title, and then the rest of redrawn print from there on. At the end, the 1936-style "That's all, Folks!" closing is done differently: the entire phrase is first seen in a white outline, and then is filled in with white.

    I am also posting this as I want to see all of the pictures of the anomalies associated with these prints.

    http://cztoondb.tripod.com/cztoondb/looneytunes/index.htm
    (I want help here: from what cartoon was the hand-colored 1940-style Warner Bros. opening logo from?)

    ~Ben
     
    #1 ClassicTVMan1981, May 28, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 2, 2012
  2. wiley207

    wiley207 Well-Known Member

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    Those prints that used the 1956 WB shield and "That's all Folks!" closing originally had it fade to the "Distributed by WARNER BROS (\\') A WARNER COMMUNICATIONS Company" logo after the "That's All Folks" logo finished. This was cut some time in the late 1980s.
    I also know that while they usually had the second half of the opening theme play on those versions, the redrawn version of "Wholly Smoke" CN used to air (with 1956 opening shield/closing logo) actually played the entire 1937-1938 opening theme from start to finish! I think I liked it better that way, to be honest.
     
  3. ClassicTVMan1981

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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yqCFo_up3As
    (from a British ITV-TVS airing, 12/82 - this is the 1939 cartoon It's an Ill Wind with full opening theme and the '70s "Distributed by Warner Bros." logo that the TAF card transitions to.)

    ~Ben
     
    #3 ClassicTVMan1981, May 31, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 2, 2012
  4. PF9

    PF9 Member

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    Whatever the case, the redrawns need to be taken out of circulation and destroyed. If I want to watch a colorized cartoon I prefer computer-colorized versions. In fact, I think every B&W WB cartoon needs to be restored and released in both the original form and a computer-colorized form (102 cartoons already have computer-colorizations, it's just a matter of releasing them on DVD).
     
  5. Voice Boss

    Voice Boss New Member

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    I agree. There is no reason for the redrawn cartoons to exist. The Computer colorized cartoons do a marvelous job off adding color while retaining the original animation and timing. I personally prefer to watch them this way normally but still ejoy the black and white version when I get into that animation history mood.
     
  6. Steve Burstein

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    When I was 11 and 12 I would avidly watch the re-traced Looney Tunes every day, taking them for the original animation! Then I started getting confused as to why they looked so different from the same era's Warner cartoons that were on other stations(and owned by UA). "Were they factory rejects?" I asked myself. I didn't figure out they were re-tracings until Joe Adamson's Tex Avery book came out some five years later.
     

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