Stuff your parents banned

Discussion in 'Cafe toonzone' started by Peter Paltridge, Mar 27, 2014.

  1. Peter Paltridge

    Peter Paltridge Steven Sword!

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    I was reading this:
    How We Won the War on Dungeons & Dragons

    It was interesting because I missed the whole thing (you had to be adolescent or older in the mid-80's for it to affect you), but it reminded me of several similar waves of hysteria regarding Protecting Our Children that I had to live through.

    For example, I remember when the original Ninja Turtle movie came out in the summer of 1990. Every media outlet proclaimed that it was the single most violent movie ever made, and that any parent who let their kid see it was irresponsible and should be whipped with chains. Needless to say, I still haven't seen that one in full.

    My parents' level of censorship fluctuated depending on the medium. When it came to comic books, my mom was one of Dr. Wertham's last holdouts and judged EVERYTHING with a superhero in it as evil and corruptible. (Of course, if I'd grown up with some of that Liefeld stuff, I probably WOULD have become a criminal, but I digress.)

    The heaviest form of censorship came down on things I wrote and drew myself. No kidding. I was very heavily restricted when it came to my own thoughts. I remember my mother getting angry when a character appeared in a cartoon I'd made with the name "Ima Jerk." "That's not nice, calling someone a jerk!!" she raged. Um.....ok. A few weeks later she got angry with me for a scene in which a toilet appeared. After that I quit showing my parents my work. At its height, I was forbidden to draw dragons (my uncle had convinced my parents, briefly, that they were real and associated with Satan) and even forbidden to draw....fire. They banned fire once.

    She was most lenient when it came to movies -- I was allowed to rent films up to PG-13 as soon as I was young enough to watch a TV. To this day I have no idea why she was so forgiving of cinema profanity, but it was the one medium where she trusted me not to be stupid enough to imitate anything, and for that, I never argued about it. Why would I?

    Eventually I was old enough that they couldn't control me anymore. When Pokemon first came out I had the games and played them regularly. That was when my parents reached into their church newsletter and pulled out a badly-Xeroxed pamphlet called "THE TRUTH ABOUT POKEMON" that alleged, among other things, the seizure incident in Japan was due to demons flying out of the Pokemon show and possessing children. They bought every word.
     
  2. Peter Paltridge

    Peter Paltridge Steven Sword!

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    Television was in the middle. I could generally turn on anything the networks put there, but there was an unspoken one-stroke, zero-tolerance rule my mom seemed to adhere to. Just one little thing could make her ban a show in an instant. I remember her becoming really angry while we watched the Home Improvement pilot. This was the first time the show ever aired. Mom said the first conversation Tim had with the neighbor behind the fence was very insulting to women, and so the show got banned for several years. I don't remember what they were talking about.

    Step By Step nearly got banned when Cody got into a bar fight (WHY I NEVER!) The ban was forgotten the following week, but I have to say the show did feel pretty edgy to me, with what those kids always got away with saying to their parents.

    The Simpsons was an interesting case. I had heard of some sheltered parents who had banned the thing on sight, but Mom thought it was okay. We first turned on the RV episode from Season 1, which was pretty innocuous (if it had been the Princess Kashmir episode, the whole thing would have ended right there). I got to watch it for three glorious years, unsupervised.

    Then during the summer, they caught a Season Three repeat that revealed Bart was conceived out of wedlock (and in a golf course!) Normally such a relevation would have meant the axe, but somehow it was given one more chance. "Separate Vocations" aired the following week and Apu made a crack that being tied up by robbers felt "sensuous." And that was the end. That winter, during a family gathering, everyone crowded around the set to watch Maggie say her first word. Except for me, who had to sit outside the door and just listen.
     
  3. Gold Guy

    Gold Guy This ain't Pokemon!

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    Um, wow. My parents once banned Sailor Moon, but that's about it. I feel lucky suddenly. :p
     
  4. Shawn Hopkins

    Shawn Hopkins TZ Member of the Year 2013

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    Nothing that I can remember. My parents were incredibly permissive and supportive. While you were listening to Maggie through the door I was probably going out to the video store to rent horror flicks, or reading horror novels or EC Comics, or leafing through my dad's Playboys, National Lampoons, and High Times.

    They didn't tolerate violence and destructiveness from me and my brothers, but that was about it.
     
  5. Dr. Daedalus

    Dr. Daedalus I presume.

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    Like a lot of kids, I wasn't allowed to watch Beavis & Butt-Head. But I managed to sneak some watches anyway. See, that's what forbidding something does: It just makes you want to do it more.

    Oddly, I was allowed to watch Duckman, despite that show having more adult humor than B&B. Don't get me wrong; my mom wasn't happy about me watching it, but she reluctantly relented. The excuse by my dad was, "Half the jokes go over your head anyway". Heh.

    As for South Park, it wasn't so much that I wasn't allowed to watch it, but my mom guilt-tripped me about it.
     
  6. MDawg

    MDawg Nerfariously planning

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    My parents were pretty lenient with stuff like that. About the only thing that was off-limits was R-rated movies. Anything else they were pretty cool with or at least accepted it.

    My dad enjoyed watching Beavis and Butthead and Ren and Stimpy with us and I went to see the South Park movie with him (we both laughed at the little boy who was 8 with his dad, both of whom said until a large, hallucination-induced version of a female sexual organ was on screen and he asked what it was a few times rather loudly).

    The Simpsons was a non-issue as well and was family TV time.

    Really the only thing that bothered my mom (nothing phased my dad) is when we'd watch wrestling, especially WWF in the Attitude era. She'd cover up her face when people would get hit and especially if they were bleeding or it was a cage match. She just does not care for that stuff at all, but didn't mind us watching it.
     
  7. Dantheman

    Dantheman Active Member

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    My parents were rather lenient and let my siblings and I watch what we wanted, and never really bought into any "X is a satanic gateway!" stuff that came along, despite the fact my mother was a devout. God-fearing Christian woman. I saw Robocop when I was eleven (although, to be fair, I was attracted to the idea of a guy becoming a cyborg more than the violence) and was a regular reader of Mad magazine throughout my youth.

    But there was one R-rated movie my parents forbade us from watching when we got to be teenagers who rented our own movies: Deliverance (and I think you might know why). My mother constantly told us how that movie disturbed her, and yet, my brother just had to see it, and went behind her back one day and rented it at a local mom-and-pop video store. Remember, this was a kid who when he was told he couldn't have his head shaved for a haircut, went to the barber alone when my mother was shopping and came back looking like Uncle Fester.
     
  8. Michael24

    Michael24 Moderator

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    Not too much was banned in my house. I did have a lot of my Garbage Pail Kids trading cards taken away during that whole controversy. I was allowed to keep some, but the more extreme ones got thrown away. That was probably the biggest thing.

    Comic books were no big deal. My parents read comics themselves when they were kids, and sometimes if I left a few out in the living room the night before, the next morning I'd find my dad flipping through them to see what was going on with Batman or Spider-Man.

    As for movies, R films weren't forbidden in general, but it depended on the content. Stuff with excessive swearing I couldn't watch, probably because that would be easier for me to repeat on my own, intentionally or not. But violent stuff they were okay with, because they weren't worried about me being able to replicate that kind of stuff. My first R rated movie was The Terminator, which I was allowed to watch with them when I was maybe about six or seven, although I had to skip the sex scene near the end. I also got to see Robocop when I was maybe 9, but again, had to skip Murphy's death scene. So it was all mostly selective and just based on what they thought I was and wasn't ready for. Movies like Aliens, Predator and Commando were just as much a staple of my childhood as Star Wars, Back to the Future and Indiana Jones.

    Horror movies were never an issue, because as a kid I had no interest in them to begin with. In fact, I didn't even start getting into horror until I was almost 18.

    So overall, there wasn't much that was off limits. There were things that would come up case-by-case, but for the most part, my parents weren't very strict about a lot.
     
  9. Dr.Pepper

    Dr.Pepper Active Member

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    I remember wanting to watch Beetlejuice (the cartoon) and Nightmare Before Christmas when I was little because my friend at preschool watched them, but my mom said "no" and insisted that my friend only saw them because she had a couple of teenage sisters. In retrospect I believe my mom was kind of right, and if my friend was an only child she most likely wouldn't have been watching stuff like that.

    The only "adult" cartoon I remember my parents specifically telling me I couldn't watch was The Simpsons, and honestly the only reason why I was watching it in the first place was because the TV was left on. I know that they wouldn't have let me watch shows like Beavis & Butthead or South Park as a child, but they just didn't come up since no one in my house really watches the channels that they come on and I generally wasn't up that late watching TV in the first place.

    I remember my dad pretty much banning Lunchables, but my mom really didn't care. I remember once when my younger brother was preschool aged my mom let him have a Lunchable. My dad later dug the box out of the recycling and cut out the nutrition and ingredients label and put it at my mom's table spot.

    Also when I was under 13, pretty much the only PG-13 movies my parents would let me watch were ones that got their rating mostly for violence/action such as Jurassic Park, but still my parents didn't let me really watch that until I was like 9 or 10. There were a handful of exceptions to that rule however.
     
  10. CoolEric158

    CoolEric158 God Bless America!

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    Back in my day, the only show my mom didn't want me to watch was Rugrats. I never understood why; maybe she didn't like it, maybe she thought it give a bad influence, I dunno. But...I still watched it anyway. X3

    As for anything else, I kind of banned myself from things; I refused to see anything that looked scary, so action movies I avoided. And, being a smart kid, I avoided R-rated movies, M-rated games, and adult television. So unless the movie was animated, or a comedy, the game was E-T rated, or the TV show was on Nickelodeon or Disney Channel or Cartoon Network, I stayed far away from that. And since I was a goody-two-shoes back in the day, I only decided to begin swearing until I was 13.

    And that's really it. Anything else that would be considered un-PC for my folks, like AVGN and Nostalgia Critic I only kept to myself, since I know they wouldn't like them, and I can't think of anything else my parents banned me from. Then again, I forgot what I had for breakfast this morning, so take that for what you will.
     
  11. ThisGuyTony

    ThisGuyTony New Member

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    The only thing my parents "banned" were Pokemon and Yu-Gi-Oh! cards. Lol... They thought it was a waste of money to buy them so I would always make my own cards with paper and colored pencils.

    They were also lenient on cartoons since they thought all animated shows are aimed at kids. Even when the local radio programs and TV shows they listened to and watched talked about how "bad" Pokemon was (that it's involved with the devil, mind controlling kids, etc) they didn't really care that my brother and I watched it.
     
  12. CyclonatorZ

    CyclonatorZ New Member

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    Bionicle, but only for the first three years, and long after I had collected all the novels, movies, and over seventy of the lego sets, my parents had admitted that they made a mistake. Honestly, I wasn't a rebellious kid to begin with when it came to media, so they had it easy in that respect, but looking back I can see that I also had it pretty good. They never bought into all the horror stories about Pokemon, Dungeons and Dragons, and Harry Potter. I'm 21 now, I play Half Life and Borderlands and watch typical geek stuff, my youngest brother just started reading Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince, and there has been no disowning or anything. We definitely do not fit the stereotype of a typical Evangelical Christian family.
     
  13. Peter Paltridge

    Peter Paltridge Steven Sword!

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    My dad was more lenient than my mom (it didn't affect much since I was only with him for a few hours each weekend) and he loved Mad. During one comic book store visit he got ahold of a big stack of 1970's Mads, and we had a blast looking through them and laughing, even though they were dated from an era I knew little about. The Simpsons was right about the sheer volume of Spiro Agnew jokes.

    Mom didn't approve of Mad. She had probably never looked into one, but that didn't matter, reputations were enough to convict. Especially when I came home with this poem: "Roses are red, violets are blue, we get our bread from clods like you!"

    There were several instances Dad let me do something Mom wouldn't, but she would ALWAYS find out and give him the third degree and that would end it. I came home from a Comic-Con with superhero trading cards. They had SUPERHEROES on them so Dad got chewed out and the cards hit the trash bottom.

    However, I do have to mention this: whenever I was at Dad's he would bring out his tapes of Looney Tunes, Mickey Mouse Club, The Little Rascals and....Saturday Night Live. No kidding, I watched a lot of Saturday Night Live as a tyke, and it didn't end because Mom disallowed it, we just stopped watching it one day. I barely remember any of it, so I can't identify if I was watching the good or the bad years. The only thing I remember is someone named Rosanna Danna Banana....something would show up in every Weekend Update. What era was that?
     
  14. CoolEric158

    CoolEric158 God Bless America!

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    Roseanne Roaseannadanna appeared first on October 1977, and ended on May 1980. So seasons 3-5. I don't know if they're good, since I've only seen the SNL Christmas clipshow, and some Youtube clips, but I'll just say it's the good years, since old is better according to the Internet.
     
  15. Peter Paltridge

    Peter Paltridge Steven Sword!

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    Huh. Then I wonder what happened to those tapes. The only ones I ran across while searching his basement were from the 1980's which is regarded as some of their worst material. Indeed, it's 1975-1980 that's considered the golden age and it's never reached it since.
     
  16. Zorak Masaki

    Zorak Masaki Active Member

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    Actually, the later half of the 80s episodes, as well as the early 90s episodes (1986-1994) are actually considered a "second golden age" for SNL ( personally, i enjoy those episodes more than the 70s eps, but im threadjacking now). Actually, i first saw SNL when i rented a best of dan akyroyd tape as a kid in the mid 80s, and even though i wanted to see more (i paticularly liked the consumer probe and julia child sketches), my mother put a kibosh on that (and since the show came on late night saturdays, there was no way i would be able to see the current episodes at that age). That was pretty much the only thing i was "banned" from, and i wasnt able to see the show again until i got Comedy Central.
     
  17. Light Lucario

    Light Lucario Moderator

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    I don't think that my parents banned much of anything when I was little. I know that my Mom didn't like The Simpsons and didn't like the idea of me watching it when I was probably around eight, nine or ten years old, but I don't think that it was straight up banned. I wasn't particularly interested in watching The Simpsons anyway, so that didn't bother me. I think that they might have banned wrestling, but that was primarily for my brother and not for me. They thought that it was too violent, or at least my Mom did, and they probably wanted him to stop after he wrested with me a couple of times.

    Other than that, I think that they were fine with me watching anything as long it was age appropriate. They wouldn't want me to see PG-13 or R-rated films before I was older enough to watch them, even though even after I turned thirteen I wasn't too interested in watching most PG-13 movies. Oddly enough, I was twelve when I saw my first rated R movie. It was Glory and my middle school teacher wanted us to watch it when we were studying the Civil War. I don't think that she asked our parents for permission to do that either. It was an interesting film, but way too violent for my tastes. Most of, if not all of, the shows that I watched were primarily aimed at kids, so they didn't have a problem with the shows I watched.

    Luckily, they've never had a problem with Pokemon or Yu-Gi-Oh! when I was little. They never bought into Pokemon being evil or any of the other crazy ideas that some people threw out about it back in its prime. They knew that it made me happy and were fine with that. As long as I didn't watch anything inappropriate, they pretty much let me watch whatever I want. They were pretty lenient, supportive and knew that banning a lot of stuff would probably make me and my brother want to watch them more.
     
  18. Storm Eagle

    Storm Eagle Power to the peaceful

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    I'm in the same boat as you. It started when I was 13, and I was 14 when my mother caught me watching it, and I was forbidden to watch it after that. Of course I still watched it though, but not when she was in the room. What killed me is when they'd have marathons, and it was never convenient for me to watch them because she'd always be home, or I just wouldn't be home anyway.

    For years I used to have my radio on one radio station all the time. On Mondays through Thursdays from 10 to midnight, Dr. Judy Kuriansky and one of the DJs hosted a radio talk show called Love Phones which ran from 1992 to about 1997 or 1998, where people would call in to ask advice about sex and what not. My mother happened to be in the room one night, and it was on, and she made me change the station. I'll admit that it could be fun to listen to, but it's just something that happened to be playing on the radio and I always listened to that station at the time.

    My mother never banned me from watching The Simpsons, but I had a Simpsons t-shirt and I wasn't allowed to wear it to school. It wasn't even anything bad. It just had the image of the Simpsons family on it.

    I don't remember my mother banning me from watching any kids shows when I was a kid. If she was watching with me though, she'd tell me things like "this is the stuff that you DON'T do", and even set me straight about any inaccuracies.

    I wasn't allowed to watch R-rated movies either, but I guess it also depended on the content. My mother actually let my father take me to see RoboCop. She figured it would be like Transformers. Strange thing is, I had no desire to see RoboCop whatsoever. She let me watch Boyz N The Hood when I was 12, but even when I got a couple of years older, she'd still get on my case about watching R-rated movies.

    By the way, how was it that you weren't into horror movies yet you collected Garbage Pail Kids? I didn't like either one of them as a kid, but I eventually built up the nerve to watch horror movies when I was 10 or 11. Ironically enough, even at the age of 34, GPKs still don't jive well with my eyes. They even had a feature film based on them. To think my mother was reluctant to take me to see the first Ninja Turtles movie. She ought to count her lucky starts that I never liked GPK.
     
  19. Michael24

    Michael24 Moderator

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    Probably because the Garbage Pail Kids were a fad all the kids at school were into, plus they didn't scare me. I knew horror movies were scary, so I didn't want to watch them. And I'm talking more of the slasher variety. There were some films I enjoyed as a kid that could technically qualify as horror, such as Jaws, Aliens and Gremlins, but because they were mixed with other genres, I was able to enjoy them. The more "scary" and slasher type films, though, I didn't get into until much later. I kind of started dipping into the genre slowly in 1995, checking out a few here and there. But then, once I saw the original Halloween in 1996, and Scream in theaters later that year, I was officially hooked.
     
  20. Blipsy

    Blipsy Tara's been a bad girl

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    Surprisingly, I don't think I ever had anything expressly forbidden when I was a kid. There were certain things my mom tried to discourage me from watching (The Simpsons, South Park), but she never banned them. I had my own TV in my room from a young age, so I learned the "change the channel when your parents walk by" trick pretty quickly. Even when I did get caught, she rarely gave me anything worse than saying "I don't think this is a good show" with no real follow-up. So I guess I was lucky in that regard.

    She did make a few comments about Harry Potter being "evil" when the movies were coming out, but I had little interest in the series at the time anyway, so it didn't affect me. A few years later, when I did start reading the books, she bought me some of them for Christmas, so I guess she either got over or forgot whatever rumors she had heard.

    My dad, on the other hand, didn't really seem to care about me watching adult shows or movies. He let me watch Celebrity Deathmatch when I was 6, for crying out loud. He was much more worried about me liking "girl things". Once again, there was no outright banning, but he made it clear that Celebrity Deathmatch was a more suitable show for a 6-year-old boy than the Powerpuff Girls was. He didn't even want me watching Fairly Odd Parents for a while because of that.
     

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