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Kennedy and the Ups & Downs of Silver Age Animation

Discussion in 'The Warner Bros. Club' started by SB20xx, Jul 13, 2003.

  1. SB20xx

    SB20xx Oooooh!
    Staff Member Moderator Reporter

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    The other two studios added to Ren & Stimpy in season 4 were Mr. Big (from Australia) and Toon-Us-In (Korea, and I think they had an office in LA as well, similar to Rough Draft). While Mr. Big could be hit or miss, usually miss, I thought Toon-Us-In was just as good as Rough Draft. In fact, I often wouldn't be able to tell them apart until I read the credits.

    But back to TTA. :)
    Well, anything involving great detail, like the explosions you mentioned, do tend to have that "look" to them, because as we all know, Japanese animation has attention to detail. Other than that, I never really got an "anime" vibe from their episodes. I think it's because the staff at TMS really knew how to do cartoony, so it wasn't limited animation when characters are talking (a common trait in TV anime), for example.
     
  2. wiley207

    wiley207 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, looking at DiC's "Inspector Gadget" and "Heathcliff and the Catillac Cats" first seasons, which were animated by TMS, they often animated the show in a cartoony manner, but on occasion you would see an anime cliche of sorts (such as Heathcliff giving the sweat drop, Gadget running in "Lupin the IIIrd" fashion, etc.) "The Littles," on the other hand, was another of DiC's earlier shows, animated by TMS during the entire run. Sometimes there would be limited anime-like animation when characters were talking and reduced frame rates, but there would be plenty of nice cartoony animation when it involves the character Dinky Little, and they also wisely avoided the old anime cliches/traits as well. Sometimes it would look reminiscent of TMS's early Disney work on "Ducktales" and "The New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh."
     
  3. Robochao

    Robochao Member

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    I just love TMS's way of animating.

    It's like anime tied in with Americans!

    But sometimes you might see an anime-like movement and do you ever think they might've let TMS do the storyboards?

    Because the only way for something like that to end up in the final animation it had to have been drawn on the storyboard.

    For example you see an anime like movement and you watch the credits and it says
    Storyboard artists:
    Toshigura Matsuyura
    Mikuhuyi Homokinu
    Arihane Poluhitsu
    (JUST AN EXAMPLE)

    Did Tiny Toons/Animaniacs ever let Japan storyboard?

    Also I would never let Korea storyboard for me because they would just use the model sheets over and over again and not come up with anything new.
     
  4. wiley207

    wiley207 Well-Known Member

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    Another bump:

    Last night I finally watched "How Sweetie It Is." I never really watched it since judging by the title it was going to be Sweetie-centered, and because Kennedy Cartoons did the animation, and since it was later in the production run it was going to have the usual icky, lumpy Namkook Lee -type of animation "Who Bopped Bugs Bunny?" and "High Toon" had.

    However, the animation was a tad different than what I expected. Some bits were animated quite smoothly and looked pretty good (pretty sure much of that was Glen Kennedy's work), but other parts were rather rough and sloppy. It was sort of almost like "Hare Today Gone Tomorrow" but without all the constant bounciness. And being as the only main character for the most part was Sweetie, I didn't really care if she'd go off model. In fact, I think Glen Kennedy's Sweetie looks cute. And I thought the Raven segment was pretty cool (thanks to Vincent Price's narration), and the bridging sequences where Buster and Babs reluctantly give Sweetie a whole show to herself after many episodes about the rabbits (or Plucky Duck.)

    And while I am on the subject, I also checked out the episode "New Character Day," which was another Kennedy episode (the next-to-last one in episode order, to be precise). Jon McClenahan's style stood out for sure, but the rest of it was as bad as I remembered. And unfortunately, the DVD version had that erroneous credit, saying that Wang did the animation. However, I DO have the feeling one bit of the episode appeared to have been drawn by Wang, sort of like what happened with "The Looney Beginning," "High Toon," etc. Maybe the miscredit was because while Kennedy did the main animation, Wang probably did the ink-and-paint work here, as halfway through the production run, Wang took over the ink-and-paint for the Kennedy episodes (previously Fil-Cartoons did Kennedy's ink-and-paint). But "The Acme Home Shopping Show"'s miscredit is the most mysterious. It's an AKOM episode, but Kennedy was credited instead. Did WB send it to the wrong studio or something? Perhaps Tom Ruegger or someone could clarify the reason for that mysterious studio miscredit on that episode?
     
  5. SB20xx

    SB20xx Oooooh!
    Staff Member Moderator Reporter

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    What about the wraparounds, especially the one after The Raven? I wouldn't exactly call that good animation.
    The only bit from "New Character Day" that sorta looks like Wang is a few random pieces from the Roches sketch (and even those are debatable). Everything else is definitely Kennedy.

    Speaking of that episode, it's interesting that there are a couple animation styles which aren't seen in other Kennedy episodes. Both appear at the end of it- the bit where Shirley wakes up Plucky, as well as when Plucky is describing his dream. The latter is particularly interesting, as Plucky's drawn in a slightly more plump manner and there's an emphasis on his teeth. The animation isn't too shabby, either. We never see that style in any other episode.

    And speaking of animation styles, I'd be interested in knowing who did the opening bits of "Bat's All Folks" (when Plucky is mixing the chemicals) as well as some other scenes which I'm blanking on right now- that's probably the most conservative Kennedy style and one could be mistaken for thinking it was by Akom. And unlike many times when I mention Akom, that's a compliment. ;)
     
  6. wiley207

    wiley207 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, some of the character models were rather awkward. I remember not really liking how Gogo was drawn.


    Yeah, that's true. That bit with Shirley waking up Plucky was some of the worst animation I've ever seen in a silver-age WB cartoon! Heck, even Glen Kennedy can draw better than that!
     
  7. The Spectre

    The Spectre Member

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    You'll notice that although Kennedy Cartoons and Glen himself are credited, unlike in other Kennedy episodes there are no other names listed for the studio. So does this mean it was Glen Kennedy in charge of the animation, but using a different studio?

    Also, how about "Fairy Tales For The '90s", where Wang is credited with animation but Kennedy with "character layout"?
     

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