Is broadcast TV really dying?

Discussion in 'Cafe toonzone' started by Cosmo, Oct 22, 2017.

  1. Cosmo

    Cosmo New Poster. Old Lurker.

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    Cable TV has been decreasing in customers for a while and it's likely that it will be a thing of the past eventually. But what about broadcast TV? This means tv channels survive but in new ways. New ways such as Sling TV or Playstation Vue. I want to hear your opinions. Cable is dying but are tv channels?
     
  2. jaylop97

    jaylop97 Well-Known Member

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    Personally I never tune into anything these days, with the exclusion of The Loud House that I catch when it premieres. Anything else I either wait for the next day when it airs online or I avoid it all together.
     
  3. sasq

    sasq Active Member

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    In my opinion, the only way to save cable television (and US television in general) is to move the channels to terrestrial television.

    In Italy, for example, no one has to pay huge bills or worry about not seeing Adventure Time, because it airs on a free-to-air channel, and has a wider audience, while in the US that's not the case.

    Does Fox really need all those local stations? their programs are known by everyone, in Italy shows like The Simpsons or Family Guy don't air on multiple local stations, but on two channels, both national and owned by the same company.

    There's no doubt that cable television is dying, and if CN or any other cable channels want more viewers and better ratings, they should all move.

    If local programming and news are a problem, they could make multiplexes (or virtual channels) containing both one of the fourth networks (with local programs but without the four letter callsigns) and the cable channels it owns, like Rai does with Rai 3 in Italy.
     
  4. Dudley

    Dudley Moderator
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    I think most broadcast TV will move to online digital. Maybe it’s programming will be streamed in a linear format, or maybe only local programming like news will. Whatever it is, it should remain free, like it always has been.


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  5. sasq

    sasq Active Member

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    and what would replace the channels on broadcast TV if they all moved online then? the cable ones?
     
  6. Takao

    Takao Fight the darkness all around

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    I've always found it comical that SlingTV and PlayStation Vue are seen as something that wasn't just cable in a different form factor. Satellite TV service never got that treatment. TBH, unless there was a gigantic cost savings I'd rather have either of those than an IPTV subscription since I live in a land of ISP data caps.

    I've seen you mention this before and I still don't understand what your point is. You do realize that most markets will only have access to one FOX affiliate, right? They aren't competition for one another and exist as a byproduct of the limited technology of early television that's now being used to provide regionally relevant content. Italy is physically smaller than the state of California, so trying to expand a system that works there for a country as large (both in land mass and population) as the US wouldn't be very wise.

    What exactly would be the benefit to viewers to have the current system go away in favour of a cable channel-esque 1 feed for all approach? As many of these local stations are being purchased by large channel operators, you're already seeing fairly standardized schedules outside of the network content, too. We're also in the early days of seeing local newsroom consolidation for entire states - where everyone is situated in a big building and records newscasts for cities they're no where close to being located to. I wouldn't really view that as a positive, but whatever.
     
  7. sasq

    sasq Active Member

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    The main four networks should still have a channel (and multiplex/virtual sub-channel) for each state, but they should be called for example Fox Boston instead of having four letter callsigns, and their virtual sub-channels should also include their cable channels too.

    Rai in Italy does just that, it has regional multiplexes that include Rai 1, Rai 2 (both have national programming), Rai 3 (the regional channel), and Rai News 24 (national).

    Viacom and other companies can have their own national virtual sub-channels.
     
  8. Takao

    Takao Fight the darkness all around

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    The call-signs are used because many of these stations aren't owned by the network (the U.S. government actively limits how many stations a network can own and operate). It makes little sense for a group to build up the "FOX Boston" brand (website, social media, newscasts) if five years from now a competing station buys the FOX affiliation. The call-sign is consistent and will live on beyond network affiliation switches, mergers or rebrands.

    The U.S. has lots of digital sub-channels, but few air any first-run material. The audience isn't there yet and right now most of the channel operators earn such significant sums of money from cable subscriptions that it's difficult to persuade them to invest in over-the-air sub-channels.
     
  9. ThunDun

    ThunDun New Member

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    I think the cost of cable is going to be forced down by the prevalence of online digital streaming sites, and cable packages will gradually start to look more like these services. High quality content, no ads etc. You can see why its succeeding - its not just Netflix, there's loads of alternative sites out there too putting pressure on the classic model. At the end of the day people are still watching a lot of TV, but they're just doing it in their own way. I reckon as a result, channels will get much tighter on the kind of programs they buy and play, really working to carve out a niche for themselves. There's a chance releasing entire series at once for people to watch on their own time might become a thing? I dont know, but it feels like schedules are starting to fade.
     
  10. Jean74

    Jean74 Happy Thanksgiving

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    One thing about broadcast TV and three channels back in the days. Really had quality and these days with 5,000 channels qauninty, not quality if you know what I mean.
     

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