"Invasion of the Body Snatchers" (1956) Talkback (Spoilers)

Discussion in 'The Entertainment Board' started by Kolbar, Aug 16, 2007.

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  1. Kolbar

    Kolbar @Cinecrisis on Twitter

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    They come from another world!

    [​IMG]

    "Well, I don't know what they are, I never saw them before. They looked like great big seed pods." - Dr. Miles J. Binnell


    Release Date: February 5th, 1956
    Director: Don Siegel
    Starring: Kevin McCarthy, Dana Wynter, Larry Gates, King Donovan

    Plot Summary: Dr. Miles J. Bennell notices that several of his friends are complaining that their close relatives are in some way different. When questioned later they themselves seem changed, as they deny everything or make excuses. As the invaders increase in number they become more open and Bennell, who has by now witnessed an attempted "replacement," realizes that he and his friends must escape or suffer the same fate. But who can he trust to help him and who has already been snatched?

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  2. Hanshotfirst1138

    Hanshotfirst1138 Singing drunken lullabies

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    A masterpiece. A Southern Gothic with a Faulkner-esque edge is blended with a sci-fi premise. As it's been discussed to death and denied by the filmmakers, I'll skip the obvious comparisions to McCarthyism and Red Scare. But for someone who lives in suburbia like I do where everything is lilywhite and pretty, this works even better than Kaufman's film, which will probably strike a nerve with all of you big-city dwellers :p. But it's the philophical themes about humanity which make the film so timeless. Really, would it be so bad? No more pain. No more sufferring. No more hunger. No more war. No more desperately trying to fit in. No more fighting with authority, no more worring about conformity. No emotion. No individuality. No life. Is life worth the suffering?

    Unfortunately, the film almost castrated by the stupid ending and narration imposed by the studio, which nearly dilute the film's message. Nearly. But everything else is damn near perfect.

    A fun bit of trivia: one title considered was "Sleep No More," a line from Shakespeare's masterpiece Hamlet. And I still think that this is where Wes Craven stole the premise for A Nightmare on Elm Street. And the gas station attendant is played by legendary director Sam Peckinpah, who is said to have done some rewrite work, and has made some bold (and most likely untrue) claims about having considerable input on the screenplay.
     

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