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How did the early looney tunes/merrie melodies survive nitrate destruction/decay/junking?

Discussion in 'Back To The Inkwell - Classic Cartoons Discussion' started by sasq, Feb 20, 2016.

  1. Kevin Mo

    Kevin Mo @Bugssponge

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    The latter two restored for DVD and these message should be in the dubbed versions discussion.

    Did you know The Wise Quacking Duck uses the black and white WARNER BROS. and Present in the opening instead of the color one from 1942-44.
     
  2. Cool_Cat

    Cool_Cat Active Member

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    Nope. Those were made for VHS. They first had one with the intro cut out (probably due to licensing issues with WB), then they released them with the intro on the tapes such as "Bugs and Elmer".

    All the Laserdiscs such as The Golden Age of Looney Tunes, The Compleat Tex Avery, The Art of Tom and Jerry and such all took from existing transfers.
     
  3. Kevin Mo

    Kevin Mo @Bugssponge

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    The MGM prints have light blue borders on both opening and closing titles. Whereas the Turner dubbed some only have borders on the opening titles and they are not light blue, but rather, green, red, purple, dark blue, orange, etc.

    MGM used their prints on their tapes but when Turner released LaserDisc they used AAP prints. The Turner dubbed version edited out the ending card but never omitted the opening titles from the cartoon.
     
  4. Toonatic

    Toonatic Active Member

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    I just want to point out; AAP (which Warner sold it's entire pre-48 library to in 1956) was bought by United Artists in 1969 which was bought by MGM in 1981. Ted Turner then bought the pre-86 MGM library (which included the pre-48 Warner Bros titles) but MGM still had distribution until 1996-1997 when Warner acquired Turner and the entire Warner library was back together again.

    Incidentally, wouldn't just because they sold their pre-48 library back in 1956, didn't mean they still kept the original prints and negatives?
     
  5. A-Cecil

    A-Cecil Member

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    When WB sold the pre-1948 library for television distribution, 16mm dupe prints and negatives were used, not the original negatives, as the original negatives were remain stored in the WB vaults. Hence WB still kept the original prints and negatives.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  6. Kevin Mo

    Kevin Mo @Bugssponge

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    If WB kept the original negatives then they technically had copyrights to the films anyways so they should have just released the pre-1948 under their original negatives. I mean, cmon', half the LT library isn't on DVD yet. Majority of the half is pre-1948 stuff.
     
  7. Steve Burstein

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    Er, do you mean Warner Brothers had copyrights to the films and could have re-released them themselves? Or do you mean UA should have gone back to Warner's vaults and restored the cartoons when they still owned them? If the latter, they probably didn't want to go to the extra expense.
     
  8. Kevin Mo

    Kevin Mo @Bugssponge

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    Yes, WB had copyright to film, the latter yes too expensive but original negative does not deteriorate as fast as eastmancolor print.
     
  9. Steve Burstein

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    From 1956 to the late 80s, Warner Brothers still had physical ownership of original materials for the cartoons, but I think copyright was another matter. A.A,P. and then UA(then MGM, then Turner)had the right to market the cartoons, not Warner.
     
  10. Kevin Mo

    Kevin Mo @Bugssponge

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    Hmm, I mean original negatives would not deteriorate as much so I mean they could use some of those for the DVD release and minor restoration.
     
  11. Steve Burstein

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    I assumed that for the DVDs they tried to use original negatives or fine grains when they could. And Warner owning the pre-48 cartoons again would have expedited that process.
     
  12. Kevin Mo

    Kevin Mo @Bugssponge

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    Saw the post this morning, but had no time to reply back, uh, I think that the pre-1948 could have been released under WB since they had the original negatives, I mean they could have even duplicated new transfers from the negatives instead of 1995 dubbed versions and the 1995 dubbed versions should have been those new transfers, not the restoration of the Eastmancolor prints.
     
  13. Steve Burstein

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    AFTER Warner bought Turner, Warner could market the pre-48 cartoons, but not before. Physically owning the negatives or fine grains isn't the same as owning distribution rights.
     
  14. Lord Dalek

    Lord Dalek Uncreative Hack

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    MGM didn't actually acquire the pre-1948 Warner Bros. catalog until 1983 so it wouldn't have been affected by any vault fire. Not like it matters, the original three strips and b/w of the entirety of the pre-1948 Warner output (remember it wasn't just toons but also every movie and short subject they made up to that point) were still safely held in Burbank.
     
  15. A-Cecil

    A-Cecil Member

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    FYI, it was not me who considers dubbed versions unrestored. Its the home video market who considers it that way.
     
  16. Kevin Mo

    Kevin Mo @Bugssponge

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    Not really, though, its more of its restored or just an old copy. But some cartoons, these dubbed versions are their best copies.
     
  17. ClassicTVMan1981

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    I refuse to believe that WB, in the near future, will intentionally destroy the original negatives of the remainder of their 1,000 or so Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies because of lack of commercial value in their minds and to free up their vault space. Whatever their current status, many of these are most wanted on DVD/streams by us!

    ~Ben
     
    #37 ClassicTVMan1981, Jul 6, 2017
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2017
  18. Kevin Mo

    Kevin Mo @Bugssponge

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    They won't junk them. They only junked their live-action films because of pre-1933 decomp. Today, while some WB movies are now considered lost, no single Warner Bros. cartoon has been considered lost, as the original negatives remain in the vaults.

    I agree many more are wanted. I would dedicate a fourth Platinum Collection to some late-30s color shorts and some unrestored greats.
     

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