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Greatest 2010 Film!

Discussion in 'Fun & Games' started by Blankments, May 2, 2011.

  1. Blankments

    Blankments The Sparkle Rises!

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    I'll withdraw my vote for Iron Man 2 so we can move on.

    Tangled goes onto the next round with seven votes.
    127 Hours and Shutter Island go onto the next round with four votes each.

    The final round! Rank your choices!

    Shutter Island
    [​IMG]

    VS.

    The King's Speech
    [​IMG]

    VS.

    Tangled
    [​IMG]

    VS.

    How to Train Your Dragon
    [​IMG]

    VS.

    Toy Story 3

    [​IMG]

    VS.

    127 Hours
    [​IMG]

    1. Toy Story 3 - Will be a classic.
    2. Tangled - Brought back the Disney magic.
    3. The King's Speech - Won Best Picture for a reason.
    4. How to Train Your Dragon - Pretty darn good.
    5. 127 Hours - Looks good.
    6. Shutter Island - I have no plans on seeing this.
     
  2. HEATXZ

    HEATXZ Duck Knght

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    1.Toy Story 3 :anime:
    2.How To Train Your Dragon :anime:
    3.The King's Speech
    4.Tangled
    5.127 Hours
    6.Shutter Island
     
  3. cradleman

    cradleman Member

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    1. Toy Story 3: fantastic in every regards, my favorite film of the year
    2. 127 Hours: just a brilliant film on so many levels, with an amazing score, superb direction, and a brilliant job by James Franco
    3. Shutter Island: dark, creepy and haunting. featured a great performance by leo and a great mystery.
    4. The King's Speech: excellent film, though maybe a tad bit overrated.
    5. Tangled: funny and moving, a great disney film.
    6. How To Train Your Dragon: really liked it, though there are minor things that put it in last here
     
  4. JustLeagExpansio

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    1. Toy Story 3. Probably one of Pixar's best films. And easily better than everything here.
    2. 127 Hours. This film is amazing. I've stated before, such a stationary concept and they pulled it off. Beautifully.
    3. Tangled. Yeah. It did bring the magic back.
    4. How to Train Your Dragon. Oh damn I hate putting this so low. This is one of my favorite animated films of the year, but gosh darn it,it was just so mediocre compared to these others!
    5. King's Speech
    6. Shutter Island. Dang. Sorry for both of these films. Tough match. Can't wait for Greatest 2011 film.
     
  5. OnePark

    OnePark גורל

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    This. I might explain later.
     
  6. Frostbite200

    Frostbite200 New Member

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    1. Shutter Island - doesn't stand a chance, but a pity vote nonetheless.
    2. Toy Story 3 - Will win this competition easy.
    3. Tangled - Great movie.
    4. How To Train Your Dragon - Another great movie, if a tad overrated.
    5. The King's Speech
    6. 127 Hours
     
  7. SpideyFan914

    SpideyFan914 Greatest Poster Ever!

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    Sorry Superpan - meant to change that vote for Easy A, but didn't get to a computer 'til now. Wouldn't have made a difference anyway.

    As for Sherlock Holmes/Ghost Protocol, I've seen both and enjoyed both. Sherlock Holmes I thought was not as good as the first one, as the plot was a bit hard to follow. However, the villain was cool and the final "battle of sorts" was awesome. As for Ghost Protocol, I have no idea what that movie was about either but it was a fun action movie, a blood-pumping action movie, and basically just an all-around action movie. Funny how both fall into the category of "confusing plot, lots of action."

    My top recommendation right now: We Need to Talk About Kevin. You may have some trouble finding it (limited release), but it truly is a brilliant and mind-boggling movie. It's about the mother of a high school serial killer, starring Tilda Swinton. Not for a night on the town or anything like that - this is a movie which makes you think, and every scene packs a punch you won't ever forget. (Superpan, you'll probably hate it.)


    Anywhoo. Thought of rigging this, but naa. It's the finals. Honesty.

    1. Toy Story 3 (Note that the only second-place vote was 'cause frosty wanted to pity Shutter. That's how great it is.)
    2. 127 Hours (Really is a brilliant movie! James Franco and Danny Boyle both brought their A-game, and it paid off. Was totally snubbed at the Oscars....)
    3. The King's Speech (Great, heart-warming movie, with great acting, brilliantly awkward directing, and a fun and inspirational script!)
    4. Shutter Island (It's the only movie in the finals that doesn't inspire you to make your dreams come true or whatever. I suppose that shows the taste of this board.... Just missed my Top 5 of 2010 (the two missing from here are also less-than-heartwarming.))
    5. How to Train Your Dragon (Tough choice between this and Tangled. I honestly like them about the same. But I suppose I found the characters in here more memorable - namely, Hiccup and Toothless!)
    6. Tangled (Though Rapunzel was one of the better Disney princesses!)
     
  8. Superpan

    Superpan Member

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    Ouch, you wound me Spideyfan. That said, I may not like that movie simply because you're the only one I've heard say good things about it. I've heard that Kevin is somewhat simply drawn, though I take it you'll disagree.

    As for Sherlock Holmes 2, I felt the plot was much easier to follow than the first one or any entry in the Pirates of the Carribean series.

    1. Toy Story 3- Is going to win this thread...and rightfully so.
    2. The King's Speech- Obvious second.
    3. Tangled- Neat!
    4. How to Train Your Dragon- Most likely out of the ones following that I'd like to see. Incidentally more on that below.
    5. Shutter Island- At least it looks interesting.,,and I haven't shown any support for it yet.
    6. 127 Hours- No matter how many arguments I hear, I can't see myself wanting to go see a movie with an uplifiting story about James Franco cutting his own arm off. Not a revenge thing, its just I have an equal disinterest in what I put at 5 and 6 and only a passing interest in what I put at 4.

    Now about optimistic movies being more favored in this competition...

    1. Age/Demographic- Most of us skew younger so either by choice or simply family needs, we go see movies that are more appropriate for everyone and thus almost always are uplifting. This explains why I usually will discuss movies I've seen as pretty much all but only coming from viewings of Turner Classic Movies since its far easier to get a more downbeat movie if you know that there's not going to be any objectionable content for your family to walk in on...and you can say to them "Look, its Humphrey Bogart!" or as tonight went "Look, it's Rock Hudson/Doris Day/Tony Randall/Alice from Brady Bunch/Sandra Dee/Bobby Darin!". Also, this is an animation forum. Clearly the cartoons are going to be favored.

    2. Emotional Needs- Movies are seen by most people as an escape. No matter whichever time you live in, we can all agree that life is terrible and disappointing. A good majority of people usually wallow in that fact and so seek out TV and films that can emotionally magnify their more positive feelings since real life rarely does. For instance, I mainly watch comedies on TV and have currently developed an obsession with Astaire/Rogers film series. I enjoy them because through watching them I feel feelings like love and friendship and that helps me redefine how I look and act about love and friendship. I don't have much interest in redefining how I look at ultraviolence or bank robberies as I don't hve much personal feelings about it. This explains why when it comes to awards season, we always rally around an uplifting movie in some way, shape, or form. I propose that most people actually get more out of those kinds of movies and it leaves a deeper imprint, though I highly doubt that's a radical notion.

    As for movies that make you think, I don't know if I would say that is film's strong suit. I mean...plays and literatue make you think because there's so little there. It's just words and people talking. However, film by its nature is manipulative. Editing, camera angles, special effects, long shots, close ups...you're only allowed to see what the fimmakers wanted you to see and even then it moves faster to a book and if you see it in a theater, YOU'RE LOOKING AT GIANTS. To borrow Faber's analogy from Farenheit 451, you can't play God to a movie. Not deingrating the medium, in fact its whyI think its the most important and most powerful, but you're mainly getting what the director or some other person on set wanted you to get and even then, its primarily by an emotional appeal not an intellectual one. You can't really get multiple interpretations besides what the directors intended, though that doesn't mean you can't get multiple themes from one movie.


    See, even if a director tries to make you "think", he'll just end up guiding you to certain conclusions. Take We Have to Talk about Kevin. I heard that the movie's main flaw that lowered it in many reviewers opinions was that it tried to make you "think", but ruined it by making the character of Kevin two-dimensional and a completely unlikable kid and using heavy-handed symbolism like using the color red alot. See, that's not really thinking, that's just being guided down one path to what the director wants to think about. Another good example of this is Inception. The ending only really made people "think" who had sufficently bought into the mumbo-jumbo about the dreams and the spinning top. Personally, I felt it was really obvious that the top was beginning to stop so I wasn't leaving the theater thinking anything except "Well, that was underwhelming".

    See, both of those movies only made you think if you bought into the director forcing you to "think" that way. If a movie really made you think, people would get wildly different things out of it like a play or a piece of literature. How many people who "get" Casablanca, Citizen Kane, Star Wars, City Lights, or The Third Man get wildly different readings from it like people do with Hamlet, The Glass Menagerie, or the Bible? Nope, its all pretty uniform because its not your brain thats stimulated, its your heart and thus you get the emotions the director and the crew WANTED you to get. This is why film was always at the front of propaganda in the mid 20th Century precisely because its far harder to dismiss a good film than it is a good pamphlet.

    Also, I don't want to turn this into a "Books vs. Movies" debate, but this may be why dated films age worse then dated books. No one blinks a eye at Tom Buchanan talking about "the preservation of the Aryan race" as polite dinner conversation in The Great Gatsby, but just try not watching "Miss Scarlet, I don't know nothing about birthing no babies" in Gone With the Wind and not wincing. Why? Because the book is already purely a mental exercise, while in the film you're watching this racism being glorified by actual human beings and nothing serves to condemn it wheras you brain has already taken care of the book's issues. A bit of a poor example I know, but I think it's an interesting insight.

    Also, here's some personal observations. I've never been much of a "thinker" when it comes to fiction because while I don't see the world in black and white, I feel most fiction blows life up to such a large extent that possible moral dilemmas become ridiculously black and white. Take A Few Good Men for example. Does giving a Marine in training at a nonvital post in peacetime a Code Red really make a better army and help make this country safer? Especially when you could have easily transferred him to another base? No, nah, I can't think of how that possibly helps so how am I supposed to feel morally complex about it? In the same vein, I've explained to people who watched 2001: A Space Odyssey and A Clockwork Orange exactly what each movie meant and was trying to go for and symbolize and its overarching themes and the people were amazed when I told them I hadn't watched the movie because I had nailed down from summaries and reviews EXACTLY what Kubrick would have wanted you to "think about" without going through 2-4 hours of watching the films. You know what was the last movie that made me think that I saw in full? Top Hat, because through their dancing and their romance, they reminded me what being in love felt like and made me think about a certain personal thing in my own life...and I can honestly say that even now my mentality has been changed by that movie. Those are the movies that make me think, not two hour adolescent preening that insists upon itself, though upbeat movies do that just as often.

    Also, if you were to look at my (arguably out of date already) top 100 list, I would say only about over fifty could be said to be optimistic and upbeat (though I admit I included movies like Sunrise and High Noon and Monty Python and the Holy Grail and Modern Times in that count, so I don't know if you would consider them upbeat) and even then, I would say most of those movies have moments of tragedy and darkness that evens out with the happy ending to create a variance of tones that could best be described as bittersweet which is the tone I strive for in all my movies because that's what life is: bittersweet.

    Plus I have The Searchers on tivo starring John Wayne and NATALIE WOOD! So, its not like I avoid downbeat movies like the plague...just the modern pretentious ones.

    Oh and in other words, I will not be updating Greatest Actor because this post, like everything else I do on this forum, spiralled wildly out of control. :p
     
  9. Blankments

    Blankments The Sparkle Rises!

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    In sixth place, not even deserving of a title is Shutter Island!
    [​IMG]

    In fifth place, getting the You Just Made The Top Five! award, is 127 Hours!
    [​IMG]

    In fourth place, getting an Honorable Mention, is How to Train Your Dragon!
    [​IMG]

    In third place, getting a Bronze Medal, is Tangled!
    [​IMG]

    In second place, getting a Silver Medal, is The King's Speech!
    [​IMG]

    In first place, getting a Gold Medal and gaining the title of Greatest 2010 Film, is Up!
    [​IMG]

    Congratulations to Toy Story 3 for winning the competition!
     
    #449 Blankments, Jan 2, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 2, 2012
  10. JustLeagExpansio

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    Sorry to be "that guy" but you have Toy Story 3 labeled as the best film of 2009, when it is really 2010 when it came out. Sorry,just had to point that out.
     
  11. Blankments

    Blankments The Sparkle Rises!

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    That's what I get for copying and pasting. :p Fixed.
     
  12. SpideyFan914

    SpideyFan914 Greatest Poster Ever!

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    Oh, you would. :p




    Superpan:

    Wow.... That entire argument just struck down half the other arguments you've made on this forum (books are more thought-provoking, old movies age poorly). It also, interestingly enough, has a much stronger basis than you usually show. Good job!

    Yes, movies are, by nature, manipulative. I would argue, of course, that all art is just as manipulative. Try writing a piece that is purely objective without any bias at all - you'll wind up with a bunch of statistics. Even simple word choice, sentence structure, grammar all affect the way you perceive a story much the same way that camera angles will in film.

    You did, however, make a mistake in your argument. You used Citizen Kane as an example. This is perhaps one of the most dividing movies of all time - I don't mean in quality, but in the perception of Charles Foster Kane. Remember when we had Hero/Villain, and there were strong supporters on both sides of what Kane truly is? "Many people loved him. Many people hated him." Or something like that.

    Movies are about more than just direction - there's writing, acting, lighting, everything. And, of course, every single one of those can manipulate the viewer. But what you have to remember is that movies are not the product of a single mind. A film is, without exception, a group effort. And while the group usually has a similar perception of the story they're creating, some members may differ oh so slightly. Many actors are taught to find a way to like their character, even if they are the despicable villain.

    But where the thoughtfulness of a movie usually comes into the picture is in ambiguities, where they are present. You can never know exactly what a character is thinking - take, for instance, the final scene of Raging Bull. Is this supposed to show repent? We will never know for sure.

    I'd love to continue, but it's dinner time. Cya! Pretty good Top Six, by the by!
     
  13. Superpan

    Superpan Member

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    Well, somebody misinterpreted much of my argument once again. ;)

    However, I'll admit I left a few points unclear so I'll just clear those up.
    1. You believe I said books were more thought-provoking than movies. Well...not exactly. I said books are more open to legitimate alternate interpretations than film is. For instance, is The Tempest about American colonization, the stripped down psyche of man, or Shakespeare's farewell to theatre? See, three wildly differing though tenuously connected interpretations of one piece of literature. Now try to do that for Casablanca.
    2. That all old movies age poorly. You interpreted that as a generalization when it clearly wasn't, but I'll show another example. Both Tarzan of the Apes and The Birth of a Nation were EXTREMELY popular and both EXTREMELY racist. Yet Tarzan is still beloved and the other is scorned. To use a more modern example, future generations may scorn films like The Ugly Truth and favor books like Twilight for the reasons I stated.
    3. I considered that all medium of art is inherently manipulative while I was typing, but if you go back and read my essays, I always make the point that film is the most OVERWHELMING of mediums and thus its manipulation is harder to push away than others. Seriously....its like the bedrock of my arguments on this forum. That point should have come across by now.
    4. My "mistake". You may have noticed that I didn't post that much in Greatest Hero/Greatest Villain and only did one post for nominations in that thread. That's because I felt the whole idea was kind've dumbed down a bit. I feel that most of the greatest characters in film are inherently morally ambiguous. Charles Foster Kane is possibly the greatest example. He is both heroic and villainous, LIKE MOST PEOPLE ARE IN REAL LIFE. He honestly should not have been in either competition as he's too complex to be dumbed down to being called a hero or a villain. This applies to I think the majority of characters of film, because the more complex a character is, THE MORE EMOTION GETS AMPLIFIED. Also, you may notice that I said about people who "get" the film. You and me, who love the film, thought of him as heroic. Those who saw him as a villain didn't like the film. Same thing with Raging Bull, me thinks. See...I mention this in my essay, because I knew that the argument would be used by you. See...I think this through.
    5. I specifically said the "director and his crew" or "the director and his fellow filmmakers". Again, knew you would pull that card.
    6. Are you really thinking about the ambuguities or are you thinking about the EMOTIONS caused by the ambiguities. It doesn't matter if he repents because he is a fictional character (before you correct me, look below), but the EMOTIONS and the REASONS that have been magnified give you an impression of what the ambiguity is. I don't think you're arguing about what it means late into the night. The film has guided you to develop a personal view. Maybe, you've decided he DOES repent, maybe NOT, or maybe you really DON'T KNOW based on what the movie told you. You're not debating it with yourself late at night.
    That said, the real Jake LaMotta repented about his past actions after watching the movie. So if you connect that fact to your interpretation of the film, then yes you are "thinking" by connecting two things in life together to develop an opinion, but that's not using the film as exisiting in a vacuum. That said, I haven't seen that movie and if you meant something else by it, then an altered version of the above applies.


    Hope I cleared up some of your issues and I too am happy with the top 2!
     

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