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Glen Kennedy Reconsidered?

Discussion in 'The Warner Bros. Club' started by SB20xx, Nov 22, 2003.

  1. SB20xx

    SB20xx Oooooh!
    Staff Member Moderator Reporter

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    OK, I know that pretty much all of us dislike the Kennedy Cartoons style and wish it had never infected Tiny Toons. And I'm well aware that most of the blame usually ends up squarely at Glen Kennedy, the founder of the studio (I've done it myself!). However, I began to ponder why he drew in that fashion, and I think I know now. Look at TV animation from the mid 60s to the late 80s. For the most part, it was static (especially HB cartoons in the 70s and 80s), unimaginative, and generic. With a few exceptions, TV animation during that time was basically a comic strip that happened to be moving. Granted, much of that was due to budget constraints, but the point still stands- it couldn't compare to the wackiness and imagination of the theatrical shorts of Looney Tunes, Tex Avery, and the like. Flash forward to Glen Kennedy, who must've been fed up with this kind of bland artwork that was churned out at overseas studios or even in the U.S. without any emotion, like many of us today. So he set out to make cartoons "wacky" again- the free range motion, the sight gags, the stretching of characters, the stuff that proves to you, "Oh, I'm watching a cartoon, not a piece of cardboard!" In fact, watching such early artists such as Bob Clampett and Arthur Davis, certain styles of animation can somewhat remind you of Kennedy Cartoons. The difference is, the WB pioneers knew how to keep their characters cartoony, yet under control, something that Glen Kennedy was never quite able to do. I say all this to make a point: Even if some of Glen's work can be cringe-worthy, atleast the guy took chances in a time when quick and easy animation was in (some would argue because the job of creating cartoons went from the artists being in control to the writers being in control). Again, I'm not saying I LIKE Kennedy Cartoons better than, say, Tokyo Movie Shinsa, which, in my opinion, was the best at combining real movement and cartoonish tendencies, but I just thought of things from a new perspective. Comments on my thoughtful aside??? :)
     
  2. rajzfilm

    rajzfilm Member

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    To be honest, I was never an animation expert. Before reading at Toonzone I didn't even notice the different styles in Tiny Toons. Many years ago, Toonzone was filled with Kennedy-bashing posts. Back then I totally beleived those posts because I too noticed how different Kennedy was from the usual style. But nowadays, I would say that's not a bad thing because the style still had charm. Kennedy was never as off-model as the posts stated, and was very expressive and had many motions. The bounciness has charm too.
    While I agree that Kennedy's Tiny Toons work is his worst (especially "New Character Day"), it's still quality stuff. And his other works (Hanna-Barbera, Disney) are high quality.
     
  3. wiley207

    wiley207 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I really enjoyed Glen Kennedy's work on "A Pup Named Scooby-Doo," Eddie Fitzgerald's Cartoon Network short "Tales of Worm Paranoia," and some of his "Tiny Toons" and Disney work.
    In fact, Glen Kennedy commented on my Tiny Toons YouTube Poop parodying those Kennedy-animated episodes, saying he enjoyed it! :D
     
  4. dumbfoolkid5

    dumbfoolkid5 Active Member

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    What episodes did this man do anyway?
     
  5. Cartoon_central

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    Look up Kennedy Cartoons on either Wikipedia or Tvtropes, they'll tell you which shows and episodes he and his studio worked on, and if you remember they were the studio behind the Tiny Toon Adventures episodes where the characters were extremely stretchy and bouncy.
     
  6. dumbfoolkid5

    dumbfoolkid5 Active Member

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    You mean the same style that's also on A Pup Named Scooby Doo? Truth is I can't stand that style.
     
  7. SB20xx

    SB20xx Oooooh!
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    Then you'd best avoid "Hare Today, Gone Tomorrow", because aside from a brief scene by Jon McClenahan, the whole episode is done in Glen's trademark bouncy style.
     
  8. wiley207

    wiley207 Well-Known Member

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    Some of it looked pretty good to me, but there were still some sloppy parts. As I once commented, I joked that when working on that episode Glen probably said "Let's see how bouncy we can draw Elmyra!"
    Glen Kennedy's animation worked really well in the "Planet of the Bunnies" sequence. Seeing as Eddie Fitzgerald is a fan of Kennedy's work, that's a given. (Kennedy animated the entire third act personally; some other animators' works can also be briefly seen in the first two acts, like that "doctor" scene with Jon McClenahan's work.)
    And it also resulted in the gag credit: "MORAL OF STORY: We need more animators."

    I also wonder if that episode was one of the few Tiny Toons episodes that was actually storyboarded and laid out at Spumco. I noticed Bob Camp was credited as a storyboard artist, and I read Spumco did a bit of storyboard/layout work for other companies in their early years, like on here and on "Doug." There were some "Ren and Stimpy"-reminiscent bits in the third act.
     
  9. rajzfilm

    rajzfilm Member

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    This is how I see it: the 17 episodes Kennedy did have different quality from each other.
    Episodes 1-5 are very similar to "A Pup Named Scooby-Doo". While the style was better in "Pup", these episodes are definitely not badly animated. The rubbery bounciness is impressive (if unusual) and the characters look okay.
    Episodes 6-13 have a fairly normal style and the characters look okay. Some weirder-looking moments.
    Episodes 14-17 suffer from stylized and incredibly varying animation. The characters have their absolute worst-looking moments in these episodes, the prime example being the last one.
     

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