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Favorite Adapted Hanna-Barbera series?

Discussion in 'Saturday Morning Forever!' started by Zen Man, Jan 8, 2015.

  1. Zen Man

    Zen Man Active Member

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    I was just thinking a couple of days ago; one of the unique things about Hanna-Barbera is the amount of outside properties that they produced shows for. Obviously they had they're own stars like Yogi Bear, The Flintstones and Scooby-Doo but they also did shows for The Smurfs, Popeye, The Pink Panther and even The Berenstain Bears (I still can't believe that one! LOL). I could be wrong, but I think they're the only animation studio that's ever performed this practice.

    Anyway...what were/are your favorite adapted H-B series? Also were they're any other properties you felt they could've adapted into a series?

    Obviously I enjoyed The Smurfs and it's interesting to see some of the creative license that H-B took with the show (such as combining Greedy Smurf and Chef Smurf to make one character). I also got a kick out of the old H-B Popeye series. I know some critics will say it doesn't hold a candle to the classic Popeye shorts, but I always thought it had the same spirit of the old shorts albeit on a smaller television budget.
     
  2. Alonso Torrejon

    Alonso Torrejon Active Member

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    I for one like the H-B adaptation of Pound Puppies. Katrina Stoneheart, her daughter Brattina, and their pet cat, Catgut make great "love to hate" villains. I also liked hearing from Lorenzo Music (as Teensy) and Jim Cummings.

    Not to mention Richie Rich. Kinda hard to understand how his voice changed from a kid's voice to a teen's voice, though. Aside from that, the best episode from that show is "Wiped Out".
     
  3. Silverstar

    Silverstar Rock the Dragon

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    It's not that hard to understand, really: kids grow up. Voice actor Sparky Marcus hit puberty between seasons.

    There have been others: Rankin/Bass' The Reluctant Dragon and Mr. Toad (a series based on both The Reluctant Dragon and The Wind in the Willows, respectively) comes to mind. Rankin/Bass also produced Kid Power, a SatAM series based Morrie Turner's comic strip Wee Pals. DePatie-Freleng produced an animated series based on Dr. Doolittle.
     
    #3 Silverstar, Jan 8, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 11, 2015
  4. Steve Carras

    Steve Carras SUGAR RUSH!!!!

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    Not to mention favorites just yet but they also adapted Sinbad (1965, after the Sam Singer/TransArtists Studio did some), Laurel and Hardy (1966,which was a heated state affairs pre-production as it was done with Larry Harmon of Bozo fame, who had already had some controversery with the duo's survivor Stan Laurel, who died in 1965, right before the release, not to mention Larry Harmon's own studio making hay off of Popeye live and cartoon being a state of legal hasslers, with Laurel and Hardy themselves returning on at least one Scooby-Doo movie (1972-1974), Abbott and Costello (1967), The Fantastic Four (1967), "New Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" (1968-1970;returning as part of the syndicated "Banana Splits" which also premiered in 1968), "New Adventures of Gulliver" (1968-1971; shown on "Banana Splits" reruns), "Josie and the Pussycats (1970-74 including their 1972-74 "Outer Space" spinoff) "Harlem Globetrotters/Super Globetrotters"1970-71 then 1977-78 for the super version), several adapations for the ABC "Saturday Superstar Movie" (1972-74), "The Three Stooges" in their post 1965 Cambria-Comedy III versions on a "Scooby Doo" movie around 1972 and in their 1977 show "Robonic Stooges" (mixed with one of the popular shows, "6,000,000 Man":). Too many other remixed shows off of TV for Hanna-Barbera. One of the most popular and so bad it's good for its own sake is the 1974 Partridge Family spinoff in space, a mix of a "Jetsons" spinoff with Judy Jetson somewhat older and Elroy as a teenager and a regular Partridge adapation but CBS eventually left it to HB, who decided on and offered CBS THIS - the "Partridge Family in 2200 A.D."(1974). Then there was that "Jeannie"(1973) spinoff, from yet another Scooby-Doo movie (and several more had the Globetrotters..frankly I would have preferred Huckleberry Hound on a Scooby Movie, instead of Yogi's Gang or Ruff and Reddy better, with Scooby on his adventures, but we're talking adapations of other properties.) There are too many other HB adapations of others's copyrights and public domain fairytales.


    I generally liked these

    The Sinbad Jr. cartoon (also the just preceding 1964-65 Sam Singer one) with a then unknown Tim Matheson as Sinbad and Mel Blanc as Salty, with Janet Waldo, Jean Vanderpyl, and Paul Frees among the regularly reconigzed other voices,

    The fall 1966 Laurel and ardy's that had some of the earliest space age HB sound effects (which originated in, among other places, their own longtime first distributor and producer Columbia Pictures's own productions: The original Three Stooges and the 1958 "Bell, Book and Candle"), and half their cartoons being 1960s superhero spoofs Roosterman and Featherbrain or something..with Larry Harmon as Stan and Jim Mac George making his HB debut as being Bob Clampett's 1960 Beany Boy, as Hardy, which today is ironic because since later, Larry Harmon would license out JIM as Stan Laurel and another regular cartoon voice Chuck Mc Cann as Oliver Hardy, even at HB themselves when made that rather misbegotten return paired with Scooby Doo! Larry Harmon actually got his due credit as the creator with Doug Young, Janet Waldo, Don Messick, and some oithers for additional voices.

    Two other unique credits are the additional Larry Harmon credit, for licensing and merchandising on the left side of the screen, and the original theme song, with Jay Livingstone (beloved crooner Perry Como's 1947 "Chi-Baba", Walt Disney's 1950 "Cinderella's" songs, and the Bugs Bunny show and others for both TV and otherwise usually with Mack David, brother of Burt Bacharach"s collaborator Hal David, but here with someone whose name I forgot, co-writing the Laurel and Hardy theme with Jay Livingston and I wish that I could remember who the other composer of that "One and One is Two" song was.) The four box split screen was another unique feature of the 1966 Hanna-Barbera "A Laurel and Hardy Cartoon" opening titles as well.


    One duo who made no such return but were animated by Hanna-Barbera, were Abbott and Costello, with Bud Abbott as himself (still living until 1974) and yet another then and apparently otherwise non-regular to HB or otherwise, Stan Irwin, whose imitative talents makes one assume his appearance as many incidental roles, as Lou ("I want my momma!""Heyyyyy Yabbittt!" Ahh..no "Who's on First" though!) with Mel Blanc, Hal Smith, Don Messick, John Stephenson and Janet Waldo credited for additional voices, and a handful of vignettes for the opening title with Tedd Nichols's theme music blaring out. Generall very funny stories with "Goin' Buggy"(a giant bug story) and "The Indestructible Space Suit" (a space suit with Bud Abbott scaring Costello--cartoon fans who remember the first Tweety Bird cartoon, 1942's "A Tale of two Kitties" or other cartoons in A&C's golden age based on them will RECOGNIZE these HB cartoons as being pretty faithful and true to the originals, esp.with as Bud Abbott does the voice of himself,a and an excellent Costello "I hope this is gonna be a pushover" and Bud ASSURING Lou that it IS a pushover, as in..LOU BEING PUSHED HIGH IN THE AIR OUTSIDE AN AIRPLANE!!), reflecting Bud the Brave...and Lou the frightened (but the one whom we know usually is smarter!).


    VERY sad update,folks:See http://www.toonzone.net/forums/retr...oker-manager-stan-irwin-95-a.html#post4951071 Now not only Abbott and REAL Costello but Stan Irwin, "fake Costello" (I guess like Geri Reischl as Fake Jan brady to Eve Plumb's real one, or Gerry Johnson's fake Betty to Bea Benadaret's real one, Dick Sargewtn's fake Darrin on Bewitched to Dick York;s real one,etc.), also is dead with the baseball "first/second" arguing comic icons. Rest in peace all three of you stooges.:)

    After this I'm not really a fan of most but will still watch Gulliver or Tom Sawyer (as a teen in the mid 1970s I had a crush on Becky, who was about five years older--she was born in 1956 as Lu Ann Haslam and I was born 1960).

    BTW Filmation was the KING (or clown prince depending on one's given opinion) of doing largely licensed properties!
     
    #4 Steve Carras, Jan 11, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 26, 2015
  5. ClassicTVMan1981

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  6. hobbyfan

    hobbyfan Well-Known Member

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    If ya wanna get technical, Super Friends, after all, was an adaptation, too, and that's at the top of my list, followed by the Smurfs. Popeye, & Richie Rich.
     
    #6 hobbyfan, Jan 14, 2015
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2016
  7. JVipond

    JVipond Member

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    No one has yet mentioned my favorite Hanna-Barbera adaptations, both from 1982: ​Pac-Man​ and ​The Little Rascals​. I have the first-season DVD set of the former, and the latter, a co-production with King World, has never been rerun on U.S. television. Thanks to a man named Joe Davis, I was able to see some episodes of ​The Little Rascals​ on YouTube, and I currently have seven of the 35 shorts in MP4 format on my private computer.

    Incidentally, this July marks the 15th anniversary of my fan site for Patty Maloney, the voice of the animated Darla Hood.
     
  8. Zorak Masaki

    Zorak Masaki Active Member

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    Actually, the Jeannie cartoon is notable for being Mark Hamill's very first voice acting job, and this was BEFORE Star Wars.
     
  9. hobbyfan

    hobbyfan Well-Known Member

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    Yep, and Mark even sang the theme song.
     
  10. Batman1

    Batman1 Member

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    The Super Friends was my favorite.

    Sent from my iPad using toonzone
     
  11. superdude

    superdude king of cool

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    5 Fantastic Four (60s)
    4 Superfriends (et. all)
    3 Snorks
    2 Smurfs
    1 All-New Popeye Hour
     
  12. Vaughn B.

    Vaughn B. Member

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    Well, for me it's The Fantastic Four, Challenge Of The Gobots, Godzilla, & The Superfriends.
     
  13. wonderfly

    wonderfly Shaking things up a bit
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    Superfriends and Smurfs reign supreme, as far as "adapted HB series".

    One was king of Saturday mornings in the 70's, the other was king of Saturday mornings in the 80's. There's really no comparison, as far as ratings go (those are the two that dominated).

    But beyond that, I have a soft spot for the late 70's HB Godzilla series, and for the mid 80's "Snorks" series.
     

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