Can someone explain the following technical details behind dvd mastering/production..

Discussion in 'Cafe toonzone' started by STASHONE, Aug 28, 2003.

  1. STASHONE

    STASHONE MF Toon

    Joined:
    May 17, 2003
    Messages:
    1,342
    Location:
    Montreal, Quebec
    Okay first off, can somebody please explain what DVD-5, DVD-9 and DVD-10 means in lamens terms and clarify their mechanical effects and differences, performance-wise?

    Also, does anyone here undertsand the technical procedures behind dvd replication and if so, would you be willing to explain in a simplified yet effective way?

    I would like to know about glass mastering, color processing, high-res white offset printing, silkscreening, spindle wrapping, etc.

    I just want to have a basic understanding of these terms and their effects. I would appreciate any insight that can be offered, sooo much!

    I am planning on having some films replicated to dvd and would like to fully understand the procedures and definitions of technical terms relating to the project in order to determine the most efficient means of having my products produced and understanding the relative costs to having such work done, recognizing where and how they are associated, etc.

    Again, I would very much appreciate any insight that can be offered.

    Thanks a lot!

    Oliver.
     
  2. STASHONE

    STASHONE MF Toon

    Joined:
    May 17, 2003
    Messages:
    1,342
    Location:
    Montreal, Quebec
    Okay also equally important...

    Professional video encoding and dvd authoring... mpeg2 conversion... dolby digital AC-3 audio.

    Can any explain the following terms and procedures?


    The films would be transfered from vhs video cassette btw.
     
  3. JDuncan

    JDuncan New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2002
    Messages:
    4,346
    Location:
    Chim-Cham
    DVD-5: Single layered, single sided disc. Holds 4.3 gigabytes of data.
    DVD-9: Dual layered, single sided disc. Holds 7.95 gigbytes of data.
    DVD-10: Single layered, double-sided disc. Holds 8.7 gigabytes of data.
    DVD-18: Dual layered, double sided disc. Holds 16 gigabytes of data.

    DVD-5 can hold about 2 hrs of video and look o.k
    DVD-9 can hold about 4, etc.
    Here is a glossary of terms from DVDRhelp.
     
  4. Adam Tyner

    Adam Tyner Amazing!

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2001
    Messages:
    5,322
    Location:
    Greenville, SC
    ...then there's a good chance that most of those terms will probably be irrelevant.

    "Glass mastering" involves creating a glass master that's used for replication. Unless you're replicating a very large number of DVDs, you won't have to worry about this. Creating a glass master is pretty pricey, and if you're doing a low-run print, using DVD-R or something similar would be much more affordable.

    "Color processing", "high-res offwhite printing", and "silkscreening" refer to different methods of screening art on the disc. It's various ways of taking a disc with no art to looking something like this:
    [​IMG]

    "Spindle wrapping" means that your discs will be put on a spindle and shrinkwrapped. If you've ever bought a spindle of CD-Rs, you have kind of an idea what to expect.

    "Dolby Digital AC-3 audio" is a standard method of encoding audio for the DVD.

    "MPEG-2 Conversion" means that you're taking a raw video file and converting it to use for DVD.

    "Professional video encoding" is the same as above, taking care to note that the video files will be converted with care to avoid compression artifacts (that sort of blocky appearance you may have seen on cheap DVDs or overcompressed image files) and related issues.

    "DVD authoring" includes the above, but refers more to the entire process of creating a DVD, from video to audio to dividing footage into chapters to menus...things along those lines.
     
  5. STASHONE

    STASHONE MF Toon

    Joined:
    May 17, 2003
    Messages:
    1,342
    Location:
    Montreal, Quebec
    ^ Thank you so much for your help!

    Is there any one method of transfering a video source to dvd that results in significantly superior quality picture or is it basically a standard procedure?

    I am trying to get the most professional looking finnished product possible for my money's worth but I guess that's something I'd have to discuss with whichever company I turn to for business...

    Anyways, thanks again. At least I have some sort of basic knowledge on the subject now.
     
  6. Adam Tyner

    Adam Tyner Amazing!

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2001
    Messages:
    5,322
    Location:
    Greenville, SC
    I'm really not up on that end of things, unfortunately, so I'm not sure what to recommend.
     
  7. RKillian

    RKillian New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2003
    Messages:
    1,348
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Normally, I'd say that asking those VHS-to-DVD transfer services would be a good way to get some of those answers. Unfortunately, the few I've tried to talk to have chosen not to respond. Whether my email was simply lost or purposely ignored I'll never know. Saves me $20+ I suppose.

    Assuming the issue is protection of information, I feel that I am qualified to comment on the hows and whys of digital video. I'd advise you take what I say with a grain of salt, though, just in case. Now let's bgin, shall we?

    Decent digital video is easy. I have two setups at home.

    Pentium Pro 200Mhz
    ATI All In Wonder Pro 8MB
    144MB EDO memory
    2GB local hard drive, 200GB over 100mbps LAN
    MS Windows 98 SE

    Pentium 4 2400Mhz
    ATI All In Wonder 9800 Pro 128MB
    256MB DDR memory
    80GB local hard drive, 200GB over 100mbps LAN
    MS Windows 2000 SP4

    Contrary to what you might think, both of these machines perform exceedingly well. Each has it's limitations, though. Since I've worked with the 200 longer, I'll start there.

    This computer was built from parts that were top of the line...in 1996. I think the video card is the newest, boasting special compatibility with Windows 98. I only ever had four real limitations with it.

    1. The hard drive was very small. I could only record a few minutes locally. Over the LAN, though...
    2. I used to have a 10mbps LAN card in it, which was too slow. It actually dropped more frames than it recorded.
    3. It only supported AVIs. According to the specifications, 2GB is the limit. This can be bypassed if you're off FAT32...
    4. I used Windows 98, which limits all file sizes to 2GB. If I went over the network to an NT machine and used another capture driver, I could go as far as 8GB.

    Despite the limitations, this machine produced beautiful digital video. As VHS only supports a limited resolution, I rarely strayed over 320x240. On the few times I went higher, I never noticed any real problems except that the picture was usually noticibly blocky from enlargements. DVDs, however, came out very clear at high resolutions. Macrovision aside, it would've been feasible to record like this if I had the time or space.

    The biggest limitation was the format, though. ATI's YVU9 codec is probably the best quality I have ever seen. Unfortunately, it's proprietary and doesn't always play so great other computers. Also, some drivers, such as those bypassing the 2GB limit, don't utilize it as well leading to a slight decrease in quality. Overall, as long as I was recording 22 minute cartoons in 320x240, they weren't pressing issues.

    The other computer, which I recently got, is far more powerful. However, I find it somewhat inferior for many reasons. Here's hoping I overlooked something...

    ATI relied on 3rd party software far more for this release. Unfortunately, that software is complete and utter garbage. To make matters worse, they removed all the editing capabilities form their own programs. This would not be so bad if the other software provided could keep pace.

    ATI's codecs don't all work in other programs, including those bundled with the card. The result is that you're pigeon-holed into using poor tools with OK codecs or OK tools with poor codecs. There's no such thing as a great tool with great codecs, unless you're willing to shell out $800 for Premiere 6.5 and God knows how much for compatible plug-ins.

    The sole saving grace is that the ATI video center does capture very nice video by itself if properly tuned. It also exports to MPEG-2, the standard for DVDs. Unfortunately, and I know I'm repeating, you have almost no recourse if you have to do editing.

    All in all, the transfer of video from VHS to DVD is not rocket science. Having software like Premiere, knowing how to use filters, doing careful tuning, etc make all the difference. When you have an MPEG-2 stream that you're satisfied with, most DVD-burner software can prompt you with wizards from there.
     
  8. STASHONE

    STASHONE MF Toon

    Joined:
    May 17, 2003
    Messages:
    1,342
    Location:
    Montreal, Quebec

    Wow, thank you so much RK, that was really informative. I'm gonna place some calls with a few different companies today and determine which direction to take. Thanks so much for all the help though!

    Oliver.
     
  9. pel

    pel Captain Marvel

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Messages:
    436
    Location:
    The Milky Way
    If you plan on doing this yourself. You'd want to encode at a low bitrate since the source isn't that great quality anyway and you'll be able to fit much more film on to the DVD.
     
  10. RKillian

    RKillian New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2003
    Messages:
    1,348
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    I cannot stress the opposite enough. Use as high a bitrate as possible to ensure that you achieve the highest quality. Your only limiters should be frame size, frame rate, and audio sampling. If the source is mono, encode in mono. Regret can last a lifetime and I guarantee that, if you're even considering this transfer, screwing up your DVDs by cutting corners is going to blow up in your face.

    Just a side note here. Using a high bitrate does NOT mean your entire video will maintain that constant level. It's just a ceiling! If your video only requires half, it'll only take up half the bitrate. The difference is that it will make _educated_ adjustments, while maintaining the desired quality, and not just arbitrarily cut corners off what doesn't fall under the imposed cap.
     

Share This Page