"23 skedoo" or "chicken inspector"

Discussion in 'The Termite Terrace Trading Post' started by B Mode, Dec 30, 2003.

  1. B Mode

    B Mode New Member

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    "23 skidoo" or "chicken inspector"

    Where did the phrase "23 skidoo" or "chicken inspector" originate from in WB shorts?
     
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  2. Larry T

    Larry T GET IT RIGHT!!!

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    WB phrases

    I believe "23 Skee-doo" was a saying that was associated to football gridiron chants in the 1920s, it might have meant "let's get going".

    "Chicken Inspector" was a term used to describe a guy who liked to keep a close eye on the ladies (and maybe even more, if he could get that far ;) ). I believe that "Chicken" might have come from "Chick" describing a sexy young lady.... and "Inspector" was a way to comically validate the term (much like F.B.I. meaning "Feminine Body Inspector"... :rolleyes: ).
     
  3. absolutpaul

    absolutpaul New Member

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    "Oh You Kid" is another one of those old sayings that doesn't make sense now.
     
  4. B Mode

    B Mode New Member

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    I thought it was "Oh you cad"...?
     
  5. rodney

    rodney one lucky duck

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    nope. it's 'oh you kid'.
     
  6. Thad Komorowski

    Thad Komorowski undecided

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    It's definitley 'Oh You Kid!' ... It's on Woody's badge in "Knock! Knock!" and Daffy's in "Drip-a-Long Daffy".


    -Thad
     
  7. Jave

    Jave Beware of the SPLAT

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    Wasn't that in "The Zoot Cat" as well?
     
  8. pogo

    pogo Resident Cynic

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    "23 Skidoo!" - a mild expressions of enthusiasm or endorsement - see "hubba, hubba!" as the last term I know which was so mild and almost charming. Newer ones of which I am aware do not fall under the "PG" rating dictated for this board. Ummm, maybe "Hot Damn!" comes close, but is too vulgar to fill "23 Skidoo"'s shoes.

    "Oh you kid" - term of romantic affection said (usually) by a man to a woman - see "Here's looking at you, kid" for a similar construct. I'd translate it as "You're adorable".

    The "Chicken Inspector" badge/joke was dead before I arrived on the scene.
     
  9. absolutpaul

    absolutpaul New Member

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    Apparently old lines like "Hold on to your hats, folks...here we go again" and "Something new has been added!" were punch lines to then popular dirty jokes. But I have no idea what those jokes were.
     
  10. guy incognito

    guy incognito Ultra-Maroon

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    The phrase "23 skidoo" has a rather interesting origin. At the turn of the century the Flatiron Building (at that time the world's tallest) was erected on 23rd Street in Lower Manhattan. The building's location and triangular shape often created heavy updrafts at street level, and these would sometimes cause women's skirts to blow upward. This, in turn, attracted crowds of men hoping to catch a forbidden glimpse of ankle or lower calf (!), and police would disperse these oglers by telling them to "23 skidoo", i.e. beat it down 23rd Street.

    "Oh, you kid" also dates from the turn of the century, and originated in a popular song by Harry Armstrong (composer of "Sweet Adeline") entitled "I Love My Wife, But Oh, You Kid!".

    These expressions were already anachronisms by the time the cartoons came out. I'm sure they were chosen for that very reason, in the same way you can score easy laughs with contemporary audiences by using stuff like "groovy" and "keep on truckin'".
     
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  11. B Mode

    B Mode New Member

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    Excellent info Guy! Thank you all for your efforts. Happy New Year!
     

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