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  1. #21
    RoyalRubble's Avatar
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    Wrapping up this rundown of Hawkeye's appearances on Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes...

    The second season of Avengers: EMH premiered in April 2012, also on Disney XD paired with the new Ultimate Spider-Man animated series (more about this show in the next part of the retrospective), both airing inside the Marvel Universe block which continues to air today, though sadly AEMH has been replaced in the meantime with another Avengers show which I don't like as much, but I'll get to this later on as well. The first part of the season features a pretty amazing story-arc concerning the Skrull's Secret Invasion, the show's longest running story-line, which was actually alluded to in the first season and has a pretty awesome pay-off here. The latter half of the season unfortunately isn't as good - the episodes have apparently been modified in order to make the stories seem more stand-alone and to focus more on the "more important" characters on the show, thanks to a change of command in Marvel's television department. The episodes for the most part are still pretty good, with some great moments here and there but more often than not the stories feel rushed.

    The season premieres with "The Private War of Doctor Doom"; from the start we see Lucia von Bardas report to her boss about the Avengers: their powers, skills and threat levels (Hawkeye's threat level was considered low). Probably the most fun portion of this episode is seeing the Avengers interact with the Fantastic Four. Clint, for example is playing a poker game with some of his team-mates and the Human Torch and Thing. There's a neat scene where he "defends" Cap's mistake of not recognizing Johnny Storm, claiming that Steve is like 100 years old. He spends the rest of the episode mostly fighting Doombots at the Avenger's Mansion, and joins the others on their mission to Latveria to save Wasp and the Invisible Woman. Doom was great here - not only was he prepared for pretty much everything the heroes tried against him, but the real reason for his seemingly random attack and kidnapping was a pretty clever way to remind us of the Secret Invasion story. All in all, a great way to start the season.




    In "Acts of Vengeance", Clint accompanies Iron Man on a mission to save the Crimson Dynamo from Amora's wrath. There's a fun scene towards the end of the episode as well when (back at the Avengers Mansion) Clint shoots an electric arrow on the Enchantress' head which shocks her (literally) just as she was boasting that no one can touch her.

    The arrival of Michael Korvac on Earth leads to a confrontation between the Avengers and the Guardians of the Galaxy, at least until the heroes stop and actually listen to what the "space Avengers" have to say. Hawkeye is present though he doesn't get to do that much here; he goes up against the Star-Lord and manages to defeat him temporarily with one of his trick arrows, and has a good line when he first sees the Guardians up close ("There's a tree and a raccoon scowling at us, man!"). There's also a neat moment with some more Clint/T'Challa interactions, when they investigate the crater Korvac created when he landed on our planet.

    The Skrull story-arc continues to build up in "Who Do You Trust?", where Nick Fury lets Iron Man know about the aliens and warns him that the Avengers have been infiltrated as well, and suspects Hawkeye to be the traitor. But before I get to all that, we get to see most of the Avengers (including Hawkeye) out of costume, enjoying a pizza in a diner trying to officially welcome Carol Danvers/Ms. Marvel to the team. It's a nice moment, as we haven't really seen that much of the heroes' private lives, and it also helps make the conclusion to this episode have a bigger impact. There's some good stuff here - not only some more background on Carol, but also more of the neat interactions between the characters. Once the Griffin attacks Carol is "forced" to fight him, with the others simply watching her fight from a safe distance (some sort of initiation ritual). Clint also comments that he's not the low man on the totem pole anymore. A pretty amusing scene.

    Following the events from the previous season's "Hail, Hydra!" episode, which introduced the Skrulls on the show (Madame Viper was revealed to be an alien), Mockingbird explains how Clint was spared his life when they were captured by Baron Strucker, fueling the idea that he's the most likely suspect. Iron Man confronts his teammates with these news and what follows is a pretty intense scene, with the team starting to fall apart due to trust issues. Clint has been considered a traitor before and doesn't want to hear any of this - he gets some great lines here as well ("I saved this team more times than I can count. I helped save the world. I'm not some alien.") Ms. Marvel has to follow orders and tries to bring Clint in for questioning, which leads to a brief but great confrontation between the heroes. In the end, the team disbands with Iron Man claiming he can no longer trust any of them. Clint gets another good line here to Carol, before she leaves (and interestingly enough doesn't report any of this to SWORD) : "I'm not a Skrull. And I'm not some flunkie for SHIELD. I'm an Avenger. And if you're going to try and take me you'd better be sure. You'd better be sure about all of us."

    Captain America (the real undercover Skrull agent) won't quit, and asks the ones who have stayed behind to remain as part of the team - Clint (quitting now would only make him seem like he's admitting he's guilty), Jan and Hulk. Sort of this show's version of the Kooky Quartet line-up from the comics. In the end, everything is going according to the Skrull's master plan - the Skrull Cap is now in charge of the Avengers, and Mockingbird is revealed to be a Skrull herself, and not just any Skrull, but their Queen Veranke. All in all, a pretty amazing episode and the story-arc isn't over yet.




    I guess this is a good a time as any to mention the final moments of this show's opening credits, where the Avengers are shown. The intro gradually evolved as the team got more members, and these last few episodes it only showcased the key characters for the episode (only Thor for "The Ballad of Beta Ray Bill", and this Kooky Quartet-esque team for "Nightmare in Red"). The latter episode introduces the Red Hulk, whose real identity is still sort of a mystery at the end and it'll only be revealed in a later story (though you can guess who he is), as well as a certain "Dell Rusk" who'll also play a larger role in the future (once his real identity is also revealed) and his team of warriors, including the Winter Solider and Falcon. The few remaining Avengers are called in to help SHIELD as the Helicarrrier is under attack from the Red Hulk, who everyone aboard just assumes it's still Banner.

    Meanwhile we get some neat scenes highlighting the bond between Banner and Clint, as the former tries enjoying one of his few days "outside" the Hulk by fishing. Clint is more annoyed by all this and mentions he already misses the Hulk. Once the news about Rulk reach Clint, he's asked to bring Banner back to the Mansion and keep him safe - they are in fact attacked by Falcon, who is defeated with one of Clint's electric arrows. Clint is however knocked out by Rulk and joins Cap and Wasp in a sort of rescue mission to save the Hulk from the Rulk. The red villain seems to be more than a match for all the heroes (and pretty much each of Clint's trick arrows), though Hawkeye does manage to temporarily blind Rulk with one of his flare arrows, long enough for the others to defeat him. He manages to escape though, and (thanks to the Skrull Captain America), Banner surrenders himself to General Ross, thus leaving the Avengers powerless, all according to the aliens' plan of conquest.

    In "Prisoner of War", we get to see what happened to the real Captain America: he's been a prisoner aboard a Skrull ship for two months. After the aliens try tricking him to give them more information by pretending they're the Avengers and have come to rescue him (one of the Skrulls impersonates Hawkeye - he even uses a freeze arrow to make things look more realistic!) Cap realizes it's a trick and manages to escape from his cell. What follows is Cap freeing the other captives (both heroes and villains) and leading them to safety, once they get past the first of the Super Skrulls.

    A group of Skrulls posing as the Avengers try attacking Wakanda in "Infiltration", claiming they're the real ones and have been replaced by aliens when they got back from Asgard. Ms. Marvel is tricked by them at first but that changes once the real Black Panther and the real Hawkeye and Wasp intervene and reveal the alien's true identities. As a bonus, amidst all the fighting we get to see the two Hawkeyes dueling - the real one obviously wins, with his skills surprising his extraterrestrial doppelganger. Even without his bow, Clint manages to catch and shoot an arrow with perfect accuracy, taking out the Skrull Wasp, before punching his doppelganger. ("No! No one's that good!" / "Guess what. I am.")

    The Skrull story-line reaches its climax in the episode titled "Secret Invasion" - all undercover Skrull agents have started disposing of Earth's defenses, and the fake Captain America broadcasts a message to the world explaining the aliens are here to help the human race. Hawkeye alongside Ms. Marvel and Wasp try getting through an army of Super Skrulls, before getting help from the real Cap and the prisoners he freed in an earlier episode, as well as Iron Man and Thor who has just returned to Midgard. There are some great moments here, some of them also regarding Clint. For example, his anger when he realizes Cap has been the traitor all along, or when he sees Mockingbird took part in all of this as well. Also some more interactions between him and Ms. Marvel, building off the events from when she suspected Clint of being a Skrull. It's a pretty amazing episode overall, and it works great as a conclusion to this long running story-line. In the end the world is saved, but not without paying a price (this mostly affects Cap, as the world won't be trusting him as much in the future), and some of the consequences to this war will be featured in the following episodes. Unfortunately, pretty much each of the following stories are a little rushed, resulting in them not being as awesome as the episodes up to this point. For the most part they're still good, but the difference in quality is quite noticeable.




    "Along Came a Spider" was the first cartoon in over 30 years to guest-star Spider-Man, so the episode (and the show) became even more special. The story sees Peter Parker and Betty Brant trying to take an interview with Cap, in an attempt to explain he wasn't the one who basically sold out or planet to the Skrulls in the previous episode. Cap alongside Hawkeye and some SHIELD agents are overseeing a transport of super-villains to the Baxter Building (where they'd most likely be imprisoned inside the Negative Zone prison 42), but they are under attack by the remaining members of the Serpent Society who wish to free their leader Madame Viper. The episode mostly takes place in an underground tunnel, below the subway tracks where Cap and Spidey try to keep civilians safe from the Serpents. It's a pretty awesome episode overall, with some great scenes between Cap and Spidey. Even Clint, despite not really doing anything worth mentioning in this episode at least gets a good line when he sees the young photographer the Daily Bugle sent ("Respect your elders, kid.").

    Ultron returns in "Behold... the Vision!", where he sends his creation the Vision to acquire adamantium, vibanium and Cap's shield in order to make himself indestructible. Cap alongside Thor and Hawkeye have traveled to Wakanda, where the Black Panther has agreed to repair Cap's shield (which was shattered by Loki back in the season one finale). Clint spends most of his time in Wakanda arguing with T'Challa, apparently still holding a grudge against him for quitting the team during the Skrull invasion so he can protect his own kingdom. Apart from enjoying the Wakandan "scenery", Clint even tries to challenge T'Challa for leadership of Wakanda though fails in some pretty comedic ways - a nice distraction from all the other stuff going on in this episode, while still staying true to the character's portrayals on the show so far. Once the Vision attacks them, the android seems more than a match for every hero present. He manages to make Clint mad when he simply disintegrates his bow ("Oh, you're gonna pay for that!"), prompting the archer to try his hand to hand combat skills on the machine though without any success. In the end the combined forces of the Avengers (and T'Challa's vibranium forge) manage to injure the android's body, who retreats from the battle before completing his mission. But he will return, and true to the comics will eventually join the Avengers.

    "Powerless" is probably the weakest episode of an otherwise amazing show. Some of the show's continuity is pretty much ignored here, which makes this story seem off. Thanks to one of Amora's spells, the Avengers have lost their powers and have to face the Destroyer (controlled by Loki). The main idea behind this episode is that Thor has to learn humility - something that already happened throughout the first season, so it doesn't really make any sense here. Cap, Thor and Iron Man are affected by this weird spell (with some even weirder results) though Hawkeye's skills remain unaffected. Clint tries keeping the others safe from the attacks of the Wrecking Crew (these guys and the previously mentioned Serpent Society were the most often used recurring minor villains on this show), and eventually the Destroyer armor. Probably the scene I enjoyed the most here was Clint managing to enable Iron Man's prototype armor to shoot its repulsor rays ("Cars, motorcycles, repulsor rays... Hot-wiring is hot wiring."), but that's about it.




    In "Ultron Unlimited", Ultron begins his plan to replace the Avengers with his own synthezoid Avengers he believes he can control. This is just the first step in his master plan - replacing the entire human race with robots he will build. The Vision leads most of these attacks on the heroes and thanks to the neural interfaces placed on the trapped Avengers, the synthezoids now have access to all of their skills and powers. Hawkeye is captured by his robotic doppelganger, as are pretty much all of the other heroes except for Captain America who manages to rescue the others (with a little help from Vision, whom he has convinced with his beliefs to turn against his master). The robot Avengers are all destroyed - the Hawkeye android is crushed by Thor, while the real Hawkeye destroys Ms. Marvel's double. Loved the way he just smiles as he says "Nothing personal" to the real Ms. Marvel, most likely alluding to their previous misunderstandings. In the end Ultron is apparently destroyed while a badly injured Vision is saved by Cap, and claims that he believes that in order to become perfect he should act more human. There's also a neat scene before the heroes are replaced with robots where Clint is having lots of fun playing around with the energy shield Iron Man built for Cap while his mighty shield was shattered (and which the real Cap has barely had a chance to use on the show; it was mostly used by the undercover Skrull agent posing as Cap earlier this season).

    When Hank Pym takes on the mantle of Yellowjacket (after he is believed dead) and starts imprisoning members of the Serpent Society inside his new micro-prison. The Avengers try to stop him but they all get trapped inside the micro-verse, with the prison about to collapse. The Serpents get free and attack the heroes; Hawkeye gets to fight and defeats Bushmaster. In the end they manage to escape and Yellowjacket is "welcomed" to the team. There's another neat scene regarding Clint when he's interviewed by the press about who Yellowjacket really is, prompting him to exclaim "When it's good news, Tony always gets interviewed looking like a movie star. When it's bad news, they ambush me. Never fails.".

    In "Emperor Stark", the Purple Man takes control of pretty much everyone on the planet, starting with Iron Man (he used one of his satellites to enable his mind-control powers to cover the entire world). The Vision - who has been repaired, joined the Avengers and has been off-line for the last 30 days - awakens and gradually helps the other heroes come to their senses and plan an attack on the Purple Man. Cap is the first one to recover, though the two are soon under attack by Hawkeye and Ms. Marvel. Hawkeye and Cap take part in a chase on a couple of sky-cycles, with Clint managing to catch the old man and try to crash their sky-cycle to make sure the traitor is dealt with. What follows is a pretty awesome exchange between the two, resulting in Clint coming to his senses. Cap's little speech perfectly describes what Clint is all about.




    Clint: It's over, Cap. You lose.
    Cap: You're being used, Hawkeye. By the Purple Man.
    Clint: Think I'm gonna listen to you? Stark said you were a traitor. So I'm taking you down.
    Cap: You've never listened to anyone. Not me, and sure as heck not Iron Man. And now, you're just gonna blindly follow orders? You've never done that in your life. And now you're gonna get yourself killed because Tony Stark told you to? No one tells Hawkeye what to do. Come on, Clint!


    Once most of the heroes are back to normal, Cap plans on confronting Iron Man himself, while the others try to use a Quinjet to reach and destroy the satellite used by the Purple Man. There's a great moment where Vision comments how easy it was to take out the Iron Man armors that weer guarding the jet, prompting Clint to teach him that one should never mention how easy a fight is - something which will come up again in a later episode. He was right though, as a mind-controlled Thor tries to stop them but the Vision manages to keep him busy long enough. In space, Clint once again controls the jet's guns, taking down every Iron Man armor guarding the satellite, and in the end the satellite itself. There's another neat scene where Ms. Marvel briefly falls back under Purple Man's control and tries to dispose of Clint, but he manages to distract her with a flare arrow. All in all, a decent and very entertaining episode.

    Hawkeye is briefly featured during the Red Skull mini-arc. In the first part, "Code Red" he gets to fight Falcon again when the latter breaks into the Avengers Mansion as part of the Code Red team deployed by the Secretary of Defense, Dell Rusk after the heroes have been framed regarding an epidemic in the city. Clint wins the fight thanks to a sonic arrow ("Birds hate them"), but starts to feel the effects of the virus himself. He does manage to find the device that caused the explosion and spreading of the virus in the first place, and thanks to his SHIELD background recognizes the device and where it came from. The rest of the episode is basically Captain America revealing that Rusk is the Red Skull (though they never bothered to really explain how he survived all this time) and manages to take him down.

    In the second part, titled "Winter Soldier", the title character is revealed to be Bucky, Cap's old sidekick from the days of WWII who has been brainwashed by the Red Skull and turned into a perfect solider. The Avengers now have to stop the Skull's giant robot called the Sleeper from destroying the Capitol building. Hawkeye is seen among the assembled heroes though he doesn't really get to do anything worth mentioning here - his trick arrows weren't the best thing in the world to stop a giant rampaging robot.

    The Hulk returns in "The Deadliest Man Alive", and once again fights with the Red Hulk - who is revealed to be General Ross, and is in the middle of his plan of discrediting Hulk and trying to join the Avengers himself. He manages to trick most of the heroes with his intentions, except for Cap who still believes Hulk is innocent. I guess the main thing that bothered me this episode was that Hawkeye was a little too willing to believe Hulk is the threat Ross made him out to be. The show has established very well just how close their friendship is in past episodes so seeing them so willing to fight Hulk was kind of weird. These three characters were actually the only ones who decided to remain as Avengers when the team split up during the Skrull invasion. Plus, Hawkeye was the reason Hulk re-joined the team after the events of the two-part "Gamma World" episode, back in season one. That should say something about how close they became. A little inconsistent regarding character development, but still a pretty neat adventure and it does tie up nicely some of the events from previous episodes.

    The Kree story-line is wrapped up towards the end of the show, in two episodes ("Operation Galactic Storm" and "Live Kree or Die"). In the first part, the Kree plan on opening a worm-hole next to the sun, which would tear the sun apart and eventually end all life on earth. The Avengers launch an attack in space against the aliens, which ends with Black Panther (seemingly) sacrificing his life so that their mission is a success, and after Hawkeye uses his uncanny skills to shoot the five generator ships, the heroes end up going through the wormhole into Kree space. In the second part, the heroes are split up across the Kree home-world and encounter various threats, such as some alien beasts on a training ground or the Supreme Intelligence itself. There's not a lot to talk about here in regards to Clint; the entire team is in the spotlight in this story, and ultimately it's Mar-Vell the one who saves the day. There is a neat little scene where Clint is reminded that one should never say how easy a fight is (something which Vision learned the hard way back in "Emperor Stark"). It's a good story with some nice action scenes and a good enough conclusion to some of the long-running sub-plots this show had.

    The show ends with "Avengers Assemble", the episode where pretty much every super-hero that appeared on the show before returns and together they face off against Galactus and his four heralds (sadly, no Silver Surfer here). The Avengers and their allies split up into teams to take care of the heralds, who are building devices that would help Galactus consume the Earth. Hawkeye is joined by Wasp, the Human Torch, Thing and Wolverine as they confront Stardust (Clint is actually the one who destroys the device with his trick arrows). With the large number of characters featured in this episode it would have been impossible to give each one the same amount of screen-time, but what we got worked out great in the end. The story did feel rushed but it was still fun and a good enough send-off to this amazing show.




    All things considered, I really liked how Hawkeye was presented on this show. He was one of my favorite characters here, though I really can't think of a character I didn't like on this series. Pretty much everything about him worked out so well, and he was lots of fun. I can say the same about the show in general - while the latter half of this season is far from perfect, as a whole it's still an amazing and fun animated series, and I think it's remarkable how much stuff they managed to fit into the show's run. I'd say it's one of the best Marvel cartoons of all time, and it's definitely my favorite super-hero team show from Marvel. A shame I find it's successor isn't anywhere near as entertaining or well-written, but I'll get to that a little later. Next stop: Hawkeye on Ultimate Spider-Man and Iron Man: Rise of Technovore!
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  2. #22
    RoyalRubble's Avatar
    RoyalRubble is offline Member Tetris Champion Magma 2 Champion Crazy Go Nuts Champion Crazy Go Nuts 2 Champion Bimmin Champion R4CE 2078 Champion Nuclearoids Champion
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    Ultimate Spider-Man premiered in april 2012 on Disney XD, alongside the second season of the aforementioned Avengers: EMH, with both series airing inside the Marvel Universe block which continues to air today. The show sees Spider-Man as a hero-in-training for SHIELD, working alongside a group of other teenage heroes (Nova, Power Man, Iron Fist and White Tiger). Supposedly aimed at a younger audience and focusing more on comedy than action or drama the show has some good moments but most of the time isn't anything special. Most of the attempts at humor ultimately fail, as the jokes (cut-away gags, the majority of which feature super-deformed chibi caricatures of Spidey and the other characters) are just not that funny. The show has already aired 52 episodes at this point (and apparently has been renewed for yet another season), and while I admit I haven't seen every single episode from the ones I did manage to watch I didn't find any particularly good. I'd say there are maybe ten or so episodes worth re-watching, but that's about it. Hopefully the upcoming third season would improve things, though I doubt it would redeem the series as a whole either way.

    Hawkeye here was voiced by Troy Baker and as far as I know has only appeared in one episode. Like I said I haven't followed the show that closely so I might be mistaken, for example he might have popped up in some of those cut-away gags I mentioned above. He debuts in the episode "Hawkeye" (titles aren't that clever on this show). He is introduced by Nick Fury and sent to protect Spider-Man from the Beetle (probably one of the cooler villains on this series). His design isn't that great either (though I think I already made it perfectly clear in this thread that I prefer Clint's purple outfit), but it works I guess. This is pretty much his default design in cartoons (with some minor modifications), and I guess it'll stay like this for a while.



    While a team-up between Spidey and Hawkeye sounds like it could be great, this episode isn't really anything special. For the majority of the story the two heroes do nothing but argue (and it's not even that entertaining), while chasing the Beetle across the city. The two get stuck together - literally, thanks to one of Spidey's malfunctioning web-shooters. Spidey breaks Clint's bow accidentally, leaving the two pretty much helpless in front of their adversary. There are some long drawn out jokes about Spidey trying to name Clint's trick arrows (I admit, I did kind of find the "camarrow" and "sparrow" lines pretty amusing) but other than that their chemistry felt off and didn't really add anything to the episode; it got old and pretty annoying rather quickly. Clint uses some neat trick arrows here, and also gets a chance to show off some of his hand to hand combat skills against the Beetle.

    Another interesting thing about this team-up was that Clint was portrayed as a more serious character, in comparison to pretty much every other version of him (even on Avengers Assemble he makes the occasional funny joke) - this did make him stand out more than usual especially in comparison to this show's hyper-active (for lack of a better word) Spidey. This much I kind of liked about their dynamic here, but that got overshadowed quickly enough by their constant bickering. Another neat touch I guess was that Clint wasn't exactly the first member of the Avengers Spidey would have liked to team up with, reminiscing about his other team-ups with the likes of Iron Man, Thor or even the Hulk. All in all, a decent enough introduction for Hawkeye though the story could have been much better. Seeing as how this show is supposedly in the same continuity as the other currently airing Marvel toons, this is pretty much the same Hawkeye we'll be seeing on Avengers Assemble.

    April 2013 saw the release of Iron Man: Rise of Technovore, a direct-to-DVD animated movie, produced in collaboration between Marvel Entertainment and the Japanese animation studio Madhouse as sort of a follow-up to the previous Marvel Anime series, which began airing in 2010. The Marvel Anime series consisted of four different shows following the adventures of popular Marvel characters (Iron Man, Wolverine, X-Men and Blade) which for the most part took place in Japan, I'm guessing as a way to make these Marvel super-heroes even more popular over there. While the concept of a Marvel anime show sounds pretty cool, not one of these shows was that great. Neither the character designs and the animations didn't look too good (though I did kind of like how the X-Men look on their show), and as far as the story-lines are concerned, not too many good things can be said about those either. Personally I found Iron Man's anime to be the most disappointing one of them all (fortunately Hawkeye wasn't featured on his show, so I didn't have to re-watch any episodes this time), and I guess I liked the X-Men anime the best though even that one isn't anything special. But I'll most likely talk more about this one when I start another retrospective later this year.

    But getting back to Rise of Technovore... The movie does seem to have turned out better than Iron Man's anime show. Apparently a different creative team was brought in for this movie, though the same animation studio was used. The characters for the most part look good, the animation has some great moments and there's plenty of neat action scenes spread throughout. The story on the other hand, isn't much of an improvement. There's lots of stuff going on here, though not much of it is actually explained and thus some scenes seem pretty pointless. The villain of the story, as the title implies is the Technovore - Ezekiel Stane (son of Obadiah Stane, sort of implying this movie takes place in the same continuity as the live-action Marvel Cinematic Universe, which might seem like a big deal but doesn't really help this movie that much). He seems pretty cool at the start of the story but as the movie progresses I found him to be pretty annoying; he's constantly talking philosophy or something similar with phrases that don't make a lot of sense (I admit, there's always the possibility that they were just too "advanced" for me to understand). He's not that great of a villain though and despite him being in the movie's title, he only appears in the story for about half an hour. The rest of the story doesn't exactly focus on his "rise" either, though it does offer us some pretty cool action scenes, so at least that part isn't as boring.

    As for Hawkeye, well he's also barely in the movie. Here he's voiced by Troy Baker (in the English dub, the version I watched. In the original Japanese version his voice was provided by Shuuhei Sakaguchi) and his design looks decent enough though it's basically his look from the Ultimate Marvel comics, which seems to be the only version allowed to appear in cartoons these days. He's sent alongside the Black Widow (who has a great design and luckily appears more than Clint) to hunt down Iron Man, after the armored super-hero is believed somehow responsible for the "death" of War Machine. It's a pretty odd set-up, which just keeps on going for about two thirds of the movie. Granted it does lead to some good though rather pointless fight scenes. The highlight is probably the appearance of the Punisher who helps Iron Man take care of his pursuers. The entire scene is only a couple of minutes long, so calling this the best part of the movie says a lot.



    Clint appears again later on, aboard the SHIELD Helicarrier where once again paired with Natasha, try to fight the Technovore who was brought there by Iron Man. Clint manages to apparently injure their opponent with one of his arrows (he slices off one of the Technovore's arms) though that didn't last too long as the villain simply regenerated his missing limb a couple of scenes later. Also meant to mention this earlier but Clint didn't exactly use any of his trademark trick arrows here - simply old-fashioned arrows. And that's pretty much everything Clint did in this movie. That's not to say that even though the others were given significantly more screen-time, they did anything better. As I said earlier the movie doesn't really stop to explain things properly so once War Machine recovers (no surprise there his "death" wasn't real) and Technovore goes completely insane and tries destroying the entire world someway, Iron Man stops him easily enough thanks to his Arc reactor, which apparently hurts the villain though it's never explained actually why it hurts him. For such an important scene in the climax of the movie, you'd figure they could have at least explained that.

    All in all, the movie is pretty much a mess. It does have some good scenes (like the Iron Man and Punisher versus Black Widow and Hawkeye bit I mentioned above), nice character designs and animation butt other than that I can't say it's something I'd wish to re-watch anytime soon. With the recent news that a sequel/spin-off/whatever anime movie focusing on Black Widow and Punisher will be released later this year (and if I'm not mistaken I saw Hawkeye briefly in the trailer), here's hoping it will turn out better.

    And with this out of the way, we have reached the most recent cartoon to feature Hawkeye... Next part: Hawkeye on the currently airing Avengers Assemble!
    "Are you insinuating that I may have previous knowledge as to the outcome of this imbroglio?" - Top Cat
    "With great powers comes great responsibility... and free peanuts." - Johnny Bravo
    "Faster than a regular sheep... More powerful than a regular sheep... Able to leap a regular sheep in a single bound." - Sheep in the Big City

  3. #23
    90'sCartoonMan's Avatar
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    Man, I really need to re-watch A:EMH (meaning buy the DVDs finally). So many great moments, and Hawkeye did indeed have many memorable lines. My favorite moment was probably Cap snapping him out of it in "Emperor Stark", although I really loved his friendship with the Hulk.

    As for Technovore, it was kind of cool they had Hawkeye face off against the Punisher, but Frank felt really shoe-horned into the movie, and the rest of the Black Widow, Hawkeye and SHIELD chasing down Iron Man plot felt unnecessary.
    "And until we meet again boys and girls, know that wherever evil lurks in all its myriad forms, I'll be there with the hammers of justice to fight for decency and defend the innocent. Goodnight." - Batman

  4. #24
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    RoyalRubble is offline Member Tetris Champion Magma 2 Champion Crazy Go Nuts Champion Crazy Go Nuts 2 Champion Bimmin Champion R4CE 2078 Champion Nuclearoids Champion
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    Hawkeye's most recent animated appearances have been on the Avengers Assemble series, currently airing on Disney XD. The show premiered last summer, and it tries to keep as many elements from the live-action hit movie intact, while also trying to make it fit in the same continuity as Ultimate Spider-Man and Hulk and the Agents of SMASH - there are bound to be some contradictions along the way especially since the show is "supposedly" also a sequel to the previous and in my humble opinion superior Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes, despite there being five or so contradictions to it only in the first two episodes. The premise of the show is very simple: the Avengers try to save the world from the Red Skull and his cabal of super-villains. Continuity is usually kept to a minimum, and neither the story or the characters have really developed so far. There hasn't been that much progress on the show, apart from a couple of instances were they used continuity rather well but even there they rushed through some stuff and the end result wasn't that much of an improvement. As of the time I'm writing this, only the first 15 episodes have aired so things might improve later on though I kind of doubt it.

    Hawkeye is a main character on the show, as member of the Avengers though he hasn't done anything too spectacular in the episodes that have aired so far. He's been present in pretty much every episode, taking part in some big fight scenes but nothing too memorable - the same goes for just about everyone else though. His voice is once again provided by Troy Baker and he does a decent enough job but the dialogue is more often than not just too odd. As with the other two shows that share the same animated universe continuity-wise, there are lots of scenes that try too hard to be funny, without any real success. Personally I consider Avengers Assemble the best of the three current Marvel cartoons. It doesn't rely on any cut-away gags as the other shows, the action is done pretty well but the stories are just too bland. It's a shame because I think the show does have some potential, but it relies too much on stand-alone stories; I honestly don't think I'd mind this too much if the episodes were just written a little better.




    The show premiere was the two-part adventure titled "The Avengers Protocol". It basically sets up the story-line for the rest of the series, as the Avengers re-group (apparently something happened to make them disband in the first place; they all had their reasons to quit, as they mention though they never actually explain what those reasons were and I don't expect them to address that again) to avenge the apparent death of Captain America at the hands of the Red Skull. Cap is obviously not dead, Red Skull takes away Iron Man's armor and becomes the Iron Skull, makes a partnership with MODOK and after he is defeated by the Avengers decides to form his own team of super-villains, the Cabal. As for Hawkeye, well there are a couple of neat moments: when we first see him he gets a decent enough scene to showcase his skills (apparently defeating some of the members of the Frightful Four team that has appeared on Ultimate Spider-Man a couple of times). It's revealed he used to be a SHIELD agent, but quit - again, not explaining things in a proper manner.

    In the second part, thanks to MODOK's nano-machines the Avengers are mind-controlled into fighting each other. Clint gets to fight his former partner, the Black Widow. Their fight is pretty cool but doesn't really add anything to either his character or to the story, other than revealing that he was a SHIELD agent (which I mentioned above) and to try and make the episode more exciting. There's also the moment where this particular exchange takes place, Natasha shouting "I hate you!", and Clint replying "Hate you more!", with the added echo sound effect which just makes it sound too goofy. Once the day is saved, the Avengers Mansion is destroyed (so they'll just use Avengers Tower as their headquarters, to match the live-action movie some more) Clint is just worried he would have lost his comic book collection in the explosion but Iron Man moved it to the Tower in time. Not too funny.

    There's also the "running gag", sadly not limited to these two episodes, where Hulk keeps tossing Clint around because it's supposed to be funny. I admit, some instances were pretty amusing but it also got pretty boring quickly enough. After the way these two bosom buddies were portrayed on Avengers: EMH, this just feels too weird to watch. Most of the time the Hulk is put into the spotlight because he's such a popular character, and it usually just leads to more him fighting with the others for the silliest of reasons. To be fair, the Avengers fighting amongst themselves was something that happened a lot on Avengers: EMH as well, but at least there it didn't happen in every episode and they at least had some kind of decent explanation for it to happen. Plus, it was usually pretty entertaining to watch. Here, it's just supposed to be funny.

    In "Ghost of a Chance", the newest member of the team, Falcon is put in the spotlight and does manage to make the episode pretty entertaining. Of course him being "the rookie" won't change on the show despite the number of episodes he's appeared in or actually saved the day, but I'll get to that later. In this episode, the villains are the Space Phantoms, who have infiltrated the Avengers Tower and Clint was the first one to get replaced by one of them - we don't get to see the actual moment this change took place but it does help get the episode moving along. The real Clint takes part in a couple of decent fight scenes with the Phantoms (including his doppelganger) trying to guard the portal the villains used to arrive in our dimension. Once the day is saved, the episode ends with another pivotal scene, fighting over the last cookie (just as the episode started); though this time Clint takes part in the fight as well since he missed the first round.

    Clint has a brief but pretty cool scene in "Serpent of Doom", where he manages to take out Doctor Doom's robots all by himself, and then tries to go up against Doom alone but he's no match for the super-villain. Other than that, the episode is pretty cool (and one of the few that actually form a story-arc, more or less), but as far as Clint is concerned, he just keeps being the Hulk's punching bag. In "Blood Feud", there's another attempt at a running gag, this time about Clint stealing the peanut butter from the Hulk. The humor just seems forced into these episodes and apart from the very rare instances where I actually found it amusing, doesn't really add anything to the story. To go up against Dracula (and the vampire Black Widow), Hawkeye arms himself with wooden stakes arrows. I admit I did kind of like how Clint still had some garlic and a wooden stake prepared for Natasha in case Tony's cure didn't work at the end of the episode. In "Super-Adaptoid", Hawkeye saves the city from the missiles Iron Man fired at the Super-Adaptoid, which were reflected and re-directed by the villain. Other than that though, nothing special but also somewhat noteworthy is that Cap used Clint's bow and arrows in his final fight with the robot. In "Hyperion", Clint uses a nice array of trick arrows against the title character but doesn't succeed at taking him down. There's also a pretty silly running gag about Hyperion winking at Hawkeye throughout the episode which didn't really make a lot of sense to me. The episode is one of the better ones though, and it also has one of the funniest moments the show has managed to produce by this point - Falcon saves a kid's life, and the kid thanks him believing he was saved by Hawkeye. That and Falcon's and Iron Man's reactions to it were pretty hilarious.




    "Molecule Kid" features Clint teaming-up with Natasha to take down Molecule Kid, son of the original Molecule Man in a mission which was supposed to remain a secret to the other Avengers. By the end of the story though all the heroes arrive to save the world once AIM lead by MODOK also tries capturing the kid. The episode isn't too bad; Clint's and Natasha's chemistry with each other seemed alright, with their bickering being somewhat entertaining at first but it did get pretty annoying as the story progressed. The highlight of the episode though is the short flashback of how the Avengers stopped the Molecule Man, where the heroes shown wear outfits more in line with their looks in Avengers: EMH, meaning Clint is once again seen in his purple outfit which was a nice surprise.

    In "Depth Charge", Hawkeye fights Attuma's invading army with gas arrows. There are some brief neat moments of him and Captain America working together to defeat their enemies though not a lot of time is actually spent on them as the Hulk is the hero the episode focuses on. In "Doomstroyer", Clint aids the others in their fight against the Destroyer armor controlled by Doctor Doom (as a result of the events from "Serpent of Doom"). In "Hulked Out Heroes", he's seen wasting time by playing video games with Hulk. Clint is the first one who's turned into a Hulk, with a pretty boring design - though the same goes for the others as well; they all pretty much looked the same, just more Hulk-like and obviously green-skinned. All this naturally leads to some more forced humor (and only makes the Avengers: EMH two-part adventure "Gamma World" look even better), but fortunately it ends inside the half-hour format. Clint is also the first one to be changed back to normal, thanks to the device Bruce Banner (who remains unseen) invented and Black Widow used.

    "Avengers Impossible" begins with a decent enough fight between the Avengers and the Wrecking Crew though the episode soon falls apart once the Impossible Man is introduced. This is where Falcon's heroics on the show so far are completely ignored and the public seems to have no idea who he is (as I mentioned earlier); Impossible Man tries to make Falcon a star in his movie, which leads to more supposed-to-be-funny scenes, none of which really made the episode anything special - in fact, this was probably my least favorite episode so far. As for Clint, well he spends most of the time running away from a Wendigo he found inside his closet (thanks to Impossible Man), and then joins the others in re-enacting the final scenes from the live-action movie, by fighting off the army of invading Chitauri. Clint dresses up as Captain America (and does a pretty good impersonation) in the episode titled "In Deep", when the real Steve Rogers alongside Tony Stark tried infiltrating Red Skull's Cabal by posing as Crossbones and Grim Reaper, respectively. In "Hulk's Day Out", he spends most of the episode alongside Cap and Falcon trying to re-trace Hulk's steps so that they can figure out the cause of his amnesia. It's not as exciting as that sounds, unfortunately.

    And the most recent episode that has aired was "Planet Doom", one of the better episodes and once again building off on previous events regarding Doctor Doom's mini-arc on the show. The story is set in an alternate time-line where Doom rules the world and has made sure most of the heroes were never born (or created, or whatever) and most of his enemies work for him. There are of course rebels who try to overthrow Doom, and once Thor (who wasn't affected by any of the changes Doom made because he was in Asgard) arrives on Earth they start their attack. These rebels are called the Defenders and in a neat (but twisted) way are composed of Bullseye (Clint Barton), Slinger (Peter Parker) and Snap Wilson (Sam Wilson). Their unique alternate costumes looked pretty cool though to be honest I didn't exactly care for any of their code-names. Interesting though that Clint took on the name Bullseye, which could be an allusion to how in the comics Bullseye briefly took on the name Hawkeye when he was part of the Dark Avengers. Either way, Clint's codename here made the most sense, probably (as opposed to the Black Bride for example). The episode is also notable for featuring Bruce Banner, who hasn't been seen in a while in animation (and never on this or any of the other two currently airing shows, up to this point).




    This should cover all Hawkeye has done on the show so far - it's nothing spectacular, but at times it was pretty entertaining. Since the show apparently has no intention whatsoever to diversify the team roster as the show progresses (other than "popular" characters guest-starring, like Spider-Man) I'd say it's pretty obvious Clint will keep appearing in most of the episodes. As for how he'll be portrayed though, no one can say. I don't think the show has done the best job so far in developing its characters or even be consistent with their personalities, so I guess only time will tell. Here's hoping things will indeed improve, and not only in regards to Hawkeye. The entire show could use some improvements in lots of areas. So far I'm not terribly impressed by the show but things might become more interesting as the series progresses. While I doubt I'll ever actually enjoy it as much as I did Avengers: EMH, this could turn out to be a fine cartoon in the end. This thread will (hopefully) be updated from time to time to mention any changes, good or bad, to the character of Hawkeye.
    "Are you insinuating that I may have previous knowledge as to the outcome of this imbroglio?" - Top Cat
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  5. #25
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    Stu
    Stu is offline Marvel Animation Age Webmaster
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    I think you've done a good job covering Hawkeye's later appearances here... the problem with him being that he is supposed to be one of the comic relief characters in Avengers Assemble, but most of his jokes fall utterly flat. He's a little too arrogant for my liking, but the same could really be said about most of the character on the show, bar perhaps Hulk and Captain America.

    Avengers: EMH Hawkeye could've been massively grating, but there is a charm to be found in him, thanks to some great lines and excellent delivery by Chris Cox.

    I haven't seen Iron Man: ROTT and your review doesn't make it sound like this is a bad thing

    Great work. I imagine this one took a loooong time to write! Thank you.
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  6. #26
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    King_of_doom is offline kiva fan
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    I'm not holding my breath when AA improves but lets see............nice review as Stu mentions, you did a nice job covering Hawkeye's appearances from all of the past and recent archives. AA Hawkeye you might say he's the only decent character of the show but not the best. The whole bickering with Hulk and Black Widow is childish most of the time like the Molecule Kid episode, you think Black Widow would act more level headed and don't argue with Hawkeye like little kids. As you mention when the Avengers from EMH fight themselves they have a reason but with AA their reasons are just too pointless and childish like the cookies scene....seriously, they where fighting over cookies? It works well with Teen Titans Go! but AA?

    Not matter what Loeb said that stand alone episodes are better, this show DOES need story arcs and 2 to 3 part episodes, it just can't finish a story with just one episode and move on with the next, gets boring rather quickly knowing what will happen next, lets see if Loeb understand when season 2 airs(which probably air next year) also see if they try to improve their animation, especially when try using CGI, the background and vehicles really hurt my eyes when i see how awful they did it(a more noticeable example, the meteors from Hyperion episode)
    You'll never get credit for my discovery,Who's going to believe a talking head? Get a job in a sideshow*Herbert West*

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