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  1. #81
    rggkjg1's Avatar
    rggkjg1 is online now Cavill = Welling?
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    We all know of and read the Claremont/Cockrum/Byrne run of Uncanny X-Men (Giant Size #1, 94-143), but can anyone chip in their 2 cents about the issues/years that followed after issue 143? Is there anything worth checking out that's on par with, just as important, or even better than the Cockrum/Byrne stories? Taking a look at these issues, the one thing that's sticking out and that I'm interested in is when Rogue joins the X-Men.

    I never had an interest in anything after #143. Despite Claremont still being the writer, I'm thinking the writing eventually gets "stale" or goes on a rapid decline simply for doing the same title for all those years. I'm also thinking the hype/impact of the original run already puts his post issue 143 stories at a disadvantge, whether it's fair or not.

    I want more single issues from the title (I wonder why the value is next to nothing for comics after #143 as well), and with the exception of the MAJOR EXPENSIVE KEY issues, my 94-143 collection is almost complete. What single issues make up the "Rogue Joins The X-men" story?
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  2. #82
    Shawn Hopkins's Avatar
    Shawn Hopkins is offline TZ Member of the Year 2013
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    Rogue shows up in a cameo in 170 and joins in 171. In 172 she then immediately goes on an adventure with Wolverine, who initially hates her, that lasts the next few issues. Or course, Claremont peppered Rogue's transition from villain to real hero out over about 100 or so issues, so joining the X-Men is far from the last interesting thing that happens with her.

    I like the X-Men in the 80s quite a bit, myself. The grittier Outback version that came about after the Fall of the Mutants is my favorite version. Except for a couple of issues any X-Men comic from around 170 to 300 can be had for just a couple of bucks, in fact I paid a dollar for most of mine, so collecting it is not a huge challenge.
    Here's the deal, I'm the best there is. I wake up in the morning and I urinate excellence. And nobody can hang with my stuff. I'm just a big hairy American winning machine.

    I'm very humble, too.

  3. #83
    Ed Liu's Avatar
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    My peak period of reading UXM started at issue #166 and ran to #211 or so before I stopped. They're still some of my favorite comics, and the stories that really got me hooked are collected in a TPB called From the Ashes. The original Wolverine mini-series happens right in the early #170's, and the aftermath of that series runs through about #173. It's intertwined with the introduction of Rogue to the team since it involves that adventure Shawn mentioned above. If nothing else, the quality and general esteem that the first Wolvie mini-series holds even today ought to be counter-argument enough that Claremont lost it after #143.

    There's actually a fair bit that happens in this time frame, though I'll mark it in spoilers in case you don't want to know

    Spoiler:

    - Mohawk Storm appears at around #173, also related to the post-Wolverine storyline
    - Cyclops marries Madelyne Pryor
    - Charles Xavier is able to walk again, but then has to leave the X-Men in the hands of Magneto
    - Storm loses her powers
    - Forge is introduced


    There's more I'm sure I'm overlooking. I thought the 80's were a pretty fertile time for Marvel, since changes happened and they stuck, seemingly permanently (and you also had stuff like the symbiote in Spider-Man and the Walt Simonson Thor run). Then again, I've also seen an argument that the best time for the X-Men is always the time you discovered them as a teenager and I think there's something to that. An older generation always loves the big block from Giant Size X-Men #1 to UXM #143 or so, which I think is good but not my ultimate favorite. I say it's that #166-200 frame, but there's people younger than me who say it's a block that happened after that.
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  4. #84
    wonderfly's Avatar
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    Yeah, I didn't really discover X-Men until 1991 or '92 (probably the very last corner of the Marvel Universe that I grew interested in), so that era still holds special memories for me, but it's not my favorite. I went back and discovered the 80's X-Men, and it was just all sorts of fun.

    I never bothered to try to collect Giant Size X-Men #1 to UXM #143, I have those in Essential TPB's, so my collection starts after that. My goal was to collect every issue from UXM #150 onwards (though I suppose I could've backpedaled to go back to UXM #144). I'd have to double check, but I think I have most issues from UXM #150 to #350 (there's probably still a few gaps). Around #350 was where I stopped reading it for a while, as I recall...

    But as for what occurs after artist John Byrne leaves (with UXM #143), I prefer to think of the arcs as corresponding to the artists who worked with Claremont following Byrne.

    UXM #144 to #164 has Dave Cockrum back as artist. I think his artwork grows from his original run from the 70's (though I enjoy that run as well), and the stories tend to be often cosmic in nature (featuring the Starjammers and the first appearance of the Brood).

    UXM #165 to #175 has Paul Smith as artist, and these are the classic issues that Ed refers to (which also feature the introduction of Rogue). Smith is just a great artist, and the storylines are cool, featuring a Morlock storyline that helped redefine Storm, and it has fallout from the Wolverine mini-series.

    UXM #176 to #211, which has John Romita Jr. as artist. John was just a workhorse, even back then he could push out tons of artwork compared to other artists. His run kind of corresponds to the emergence of the New Mutants spin off title from that time period, but it also has LOTS more of Rogue's growth with the X-Men, some tie-in's with the Secret Wars stuff that was popular in the 80's, and the famous "Trial of Magneto" storyline. Also contains the fun "Kulan Gath" storyline where the world is transformed into the Age of Conan (the Barbarian, not the late night host).

    UXM #212 to 244 has several artists, but Marc Silvestri was probably the most notable. Has classic storylines like "Fall of the Mutants" and "Morlock Massacre", and the "X-Men in Australia" period which Shawn mentioned.

    UXM #245 to #280 actually takes us into the 90's (the first few issues are in 1989, and runs till 1992) but that's the Jim Lee era, and it's classic as well, with the "X-Tinction Agenda" and "Muir Island" story arcs (and I end Jim Lee's "era" with UXM #280 as that leads into the "Blue and Gold Teams" era).

  5. #85
    Jin Kazama's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Liu View Post
    Then again, I've also seen an argument that the best time for the X-Men is always the time you discovered them as a teenager and I think there's something to that. An older generation always loves the big block from Giant Size X-Men #1 to UXM #143 or so, which I think is good but not my ultimate favorite. I say it's that #166-200 frame, but there's people younger than me who say it's a block that happened after that.
    I can see truth in that. I didn't start reading until the Joe Madureira issues, and they still hold a prominent spot on my list of "Best X-Men" times. Sure, there were some fairly stupid stuff (savage Wolverine, two Magnetos, Onslaught), but I loved the things like "Age of Apocalypse," the beginning of Generation X and the Gambit on trial stuff. One of the my more recent tasks has been to search out X-Books from around that time (I picked #300 as a starting point and am up to around #375), and they still, to me, hold up fairly well.
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  6. #86
    JTMarsh's Avatar
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    I'd like to recommend ''Immortals: Gods And Heroes", the prequel tie in comic collection of short stories that explore in greater depth the universe set up in the 2011 film "Immortals" starring Henry Cavill, Mickey Rourke, Luke Evans, and Isabel Lucas, to those who enjoyed the film and even those who didn't. I liked the film despite its flaws but I think the short stories in G&H trade would have made for an even more fascinating (though possibly harder to market) film. The stories themselves are well written, with contributions from but not limited to Brian Clevinger, Jeff Parker, and David Gallaher, and offer more insight into the minds and motivations of Zeus and Hyperion and even the Beast/Minotaur, with fantastic art by the likes of Dennis Calero, Kevin Colden, and Scott Hampton, among others.
    Last edited by JTMarsh; 01-10-2013 at 06:45 PM.

  7. #87
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    Hey guys. Recently started to read Marvel particularly Marvel Now I guess. Never really read marvel before and I feel like I'm missing out on a lot of the history. What can you guys recommend so that I can be well versed in what's going on in X-men and All New X-Men? (I'm going to also start reading Uncanny X-Men and Uncanny X-Force) I've already read AvX.
    Thanks.

  8. #88
    GWOtaku's Avatar
    GWOtaku is online now Moderator
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    Here's a killer Superman sale at Comixology coinciding with Man of Steel. Lots of issues from Action Comics, Adventures of Superman and the 1987 - 2006 Superman run.

    The sale also includes Superman/Batman (and this three-issue Trinity adventure, which I'm sorry to say I found pretty lame), Kingdom Come, All-Star Superman, Secret Identity, Secret Origin, Superman for All Seasons, Superman: Red Son Lex Luthor: Man of Steel, and Man of Steel + Superman Birthright are back on sale again. Might do Birthright based on earlier recommendation.

    Aside from that, what's really good? I bought Red Son and I've already got Kingdom Come + All-Star Superman in book format. I'm currently inclined against bothering with Death of Superman issues (easier to follow in book format, if I decide to read it) and Superman/Batman since I feel like the DC animated movies they spawned showed me enough.

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  9. #89
    Ed Liu's Avatar
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    It looks like you can get both parts of Alan Moore's "Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?" in there (Superman (1939-2011) #423 and Action Comics (1939-2011) #583), which I'd highly recommend if you haven't already read them. Other than that, I would also give my highest recommendation to the 4-part mini of Superman: Secret Identity (especially if they're offering it for 99-cents an issue) and documented why in my "Superman: Reading Room" article from a few years ago.
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  10. #90
    rggkjg1's Avatar
    rggkjg1 is online now Cavill = Welling?
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    Is the first issue of the new Astro City ongoing series a nice accessible sampling of what it's all about, or do you need to have read the previous material when going into the new ongoing series (of which I havent)?
    Drop everything you are doing and google "michael keaton birdman". They are making a BIRDMAN movie starring MICHAEL KEATON. (supposedly not related to the Hanna-Barbera Birdman)

    BIRDMAN
    OCTOBER 2014

  11. #91
    wonderfly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rggkjg1 View Post
    Is the first issue of the new Astro City ongoing series a nice accessible sampling of what it's all about, or do you need to have read the previous material when going into the new ongoing series (of which I havent)?
    I haven't read the first issue of the new series, but Kurt Busiek's Astro City material is known for being easily accessible for new readers to join in (in my opinion). Lots of his issues are self-contained stories, and even the storylines are self-contained - in the past, it's been kind of an anthology series: you may have a stand alone issue focus on the superhero known as "The Samaritan", then a 3 to 6 issue storyline focusing on some other hero (or villain!). The story overall follows the events of the city, not any one specific character or plotline. The stories may be set in different timelines as well (one story set in the 1950's, another set in the present day).

  12. #92
    Neo-god's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toxic Decay View Post
    Hey guys. Recently started to read Marvel particularly Marvel Now I guess. Never really read marvel before and I feel like I'm missing out on a lot of the history. What can you guys recommend so that I can be well versed in what's going on in X-men and All New X-Men? (I'm going to also start reading Uncanny X-Men and Uncanny X-Force) I've already read AvX.
    Thanks.
    I'd recommend AvX: Consequences, which bridges AvX and the Bendis books.

    For back issues, X-Men Season One or Jeff Parker's X-Men: First Class would be good for covering the O5 X-Men who get time-travelled to the present.

    I think that's pretty much all you would need.

  13. #93
    rggkjg1's Avatar
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    Does anyone know if Marvel has a similar official suggested/recommended reading list like either of these DC lists? I've read mostly everything on both lists and want to see how I compare with a Marvel list if one exists.

    DC Essential 25 Graphic Novels (read 21 of 25):
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    DC 30 Essential Graphic Novels (older list that was slimmed down to the 25 list above. read 19 of 30)
    DC Comic's 30 Essential Graphic Novels ~ Collected Editions
    Drop everything you are doing and google "michael keaton birdman". They are making a BIRDMAN movie starring MICHAEL KEATON. (supposedly not related to the Hanna-Barbera Birdman)

    BIRDMAN
    OCTOBER 2014

  14. #94
    Anime-Technocrat's Avatar
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    BD (Bandess Dessinee)

    Holy Moly I wish I knew about that stuff sooner.

    I can't recommend BD (Bandess Dessinee) or French Franco Belgian comic book tomes straight outta France enough. I started writing a blog about them.

    They're exactly like anime and manga in terms of detail levels and visuals, but more Western.

    They're incredibly obscure, and when you say french comics, most people only know of the big three:

    Tintin (Herge)
    Asterix
    Moebius

    But there's a neo movement going on, with books like Blacksad and Monster Allergy, and createurs like Enki Bilal

    I noticed they kind of draw comics like I do (quite frankly), and it intrigued me to see a national style so similar to my own that WASN'T Bone, Sin City, or One Piece/Tezuka.

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    If you live in Asia, you stand a much better chance of drawing anime and manga in a studio better than everyone else.

    If you live in North America, apply that rule to traditional American cartoons instead.



  15. #95
    GWOtaku's Avatar
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    Hey, anybody ever read the old Samurai Jack comics? The ones collected in the "Samurai Jack Classics" collections now? Getting curious about those. I'm following the current comic run from IDW and am enjoying that one, my only complaint being that I wish the books could be longer.

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    I would suggest that it's not the medium, but the quality of perception and expression, that determines the significance of art. But what would a cartoonist know? -Bill Watterson
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