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  1. When your thoughts just go askew

    by , 07-26-2014 at 08:47 PM
    Well, with Halloween being among the next big holidays on the list, i am attempting to get a jump on it early. However, once again, my brain is working against me and one of the ways it's doing so is perverting my view of my favorite Horror monster, the Werewolf.


    You see, whenever i think about werewolves these days, i think about the seldom seen second season of a Tv show that i (more or less) liked: Legend of the Dragon. In that season of the show, there was a new character, ...
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  2. Animation and American Culture (Part 2.3: Fleischer Studios in the 1930s)

    by , 07-22-2014 at 06:56 PM

    Fleischer Studios in the 1930s:


    Founded by Max and Dave Fleischer in 1921, Fleischer Studios was known for releasing more gag-oriented cartoons with simpler stories, taking things much less seriously. Unlike Disney, a majority of the studios original characters, such as Koko the Clown and Bimbo (not what you think), have faded in to relative obscurity over time. There are two prominent characters, however, that are still remembered by pop culture today. Theres Betty Boop, Fleischers ...
  3. Animation and American Culture (Part 2.2: Disney in the 1930s)

    by , 07-22-2014 at 02:23 PM

    Disney in the 1930s:


    Disney, of course, is one of the most famous studios during this era, effectively getting its start at this time. During the 1930s, Disneys most successful theatrical series were Silly Symphonies and Mickey Mouse (staring you know who). From a narrative standpoint, Disney cartoons started out simple enough. Of the cartoons released early in the decade, their plots usually consist of happy characters dancing around to music for six or seven minutes; the ...
  4. Animation and American Culture (Part 2.1: Animation in the 1930s)

    by , 07-22-2014 at 02:17 PM
    Animation in the 1930s
    Cartoons in America, for the most part begin here, in black and white. The 1930s and 1940s are considered the theatrical era of cartoons because they were made for and seen only in theaters, either before or after the feature. The early cartoons started out as having little to no narrative structure, preferring simultaneity and simple montages of synchronized characters dancing to music. However, as animation developed as a legitimate form of entertainment over the ...
  5. Animation and American Culture (Part 1: Intro)

    by , 07-22-2014 at 02:00 PM

    Hi all!

    So, a little while ago, I felt like writing a paper about animation and attempt to analyze and describe its impact on American culture over the decades. Now I feel like sharing it. Not that I think it's a great paper (in fact, I feel like it could use A LOT more content to do justice to its subject), but I'm hoping it might incite some good discussion about a field we all love. At the very least, I get to finally express thoughts that have been buzzing around my head for a

    ...

 
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