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  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacob T. Paschal View Post
    The way they direct or think about animation hasn't really changed or evolved. Shows like Teen Titans or The Batman, which supposedly are influenced by Japanese animation, only display surface-level character design aspects to 'appear' as if they're being Japanese animation. The actual technique or manner in which animation is approached and executed hasn't changed. Japanese animation such as the above clip from Pretty Cure or the aforementioned recommended Naruto Shippuuden episode #322 isn't simply made that high-quality by tossing money at it (at most I suspect the latter had a budget around $200,000) but rather by the staff's talent and ambition to create interesting images. This thread is littered with examples of such ambition and talent, all creating wonderful cuts of animation using sparse amounts of money and sleeping under their desks.

    American animation has become very sterile, studios (as in the producers, directors, and storyboard artists) are very conscious of trying to keep their shows looking one hundred percent on-model at all times and rubbing out any animator individuality. I remember reading a blog post (where I cannot for the life of me remember) that claimed Matt Groening specifically did his best to rub the more creative bits of animation flexibility out of The Simpsons. Compare earlier episodes where a character moves with such glee to more recent ones, the series looks completely different. I think we see some of this in shows like Young Justice where characters simply look like cardboard cutouts of their character model sheets when they're moving. I think there's a fear to really break free from what they've been teaching in animation schools for the last few decades, which is a shame.
    I think part of that mentality also lies in the general public and most animation watchers. Whom many will decry that the animation suddenly looks wrong if something's even remotely different about it.

    Think about it, most animators have a standard to keep, and who do you think they have to cater to? Certainly not people like us, that's for sure.

    Well that, and stuff like Flash and Toon Boom have made the market pretty sterile since their introduction.
    Aw come on, you expect me to put something witty here?

  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philmister978 View Post
    I think part of that mentality also lies in the general public and most animation watchers. Whom many will decry that the animation suddenly looks wrong if something's even remotely different about it.

    Think about it, most animators have a standard to keep, and who do you think they have to cater to? Certainly not people like us, that's for sure.

    Well that, and stuff like Flash and Toon Boom have made the market pretty sterile since their introduction.
    I think that's a terrible mentality that, while prevalent, really ought to be ignored and fought against. Our great nation has abandoned traditional animation far too early for 3D CGI which doesn't carry even a tenth of the emotional resonance.

    I also wouldn't write off flash. The problem isn't flash, but the appliance of it. The first seven-ish minutes of Naruto Shippuuden episode #167 were drawn entirely in flash by Yamashita Shingo, he even did the in-between drawings himself. Over five thousand five hundred drawings were used for his segment, creating lush imagery that completely outstrips something like Johnny Test. The current Opening animation (directed by Yamashita) was created entirely digitally, too. Digital technologies have allowed many talented animators to expand the game, like the aforementioned Yamashita, Ryou-Chimo, Kutsuna Ken'ichi and Oda Gosei to redefine the look of animation. That's to say nothing of what Austria-based animator BahiJD has accomplished as a digital/flash animator.
    TCG | Let's Sakuga: Discussing animation and the people who make it!

  3. #83
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    Philmister978 is offline Alvight, you vin
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacob T. Paschal View Post
    I think that's a terrible mentality that, while prevalent, really ought to be ignored and fought against. Our great nation has abandoned traditional animation far too early for 3D CGI which doesn't carry even a tenth of the emotional resonance.
    Bizarrely that's what some people in the business has thought too. Also, I don't see what's so bad about CGI.

    Though I think another problem is that most American cartoons are often colored in, but lack the proper shading (unless necessary) needed to make them look less like cardboard and more weighted down. I've seen this happen quite often. More so after the switch from traditional ink & paint to digital coloring. Or they have really bright colors to, you know, attract the kiddies. Whereas the Japanese use much more subtle shading/coloring.
    Aw come on, you expect me to put something witty here?

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    With a little simple Japanese knowledge and the power of Twitter I have confirmed with Shida Naotoshi-san that the above cuts from Dragon Ball episode #96 are indeed his. I feel like I just got a Twitter reply from God himself! Now I have a basis for checking out what other pieces are his and how to discern him from Obara Tai'ichirou-san. This is great as I don't think anyone's really gone in and tried to categorize Shida's older Dragon Ball works.
    Last edited by Jacob T. Paschal; 08-08-2013 at 02:28 AM. Reason: Fixed typo.
    TCG | Let's Sakuga: Discussing animation and the people who make it!

  5. #85
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    Getting a reply from the man himself... That's awesome. It's amazing how quick and easy Twitter has made it for people and fans who really wouldn't be able to otherwise to communicate with each other.

    Also, it's pretty neat how even back in his earlier work you can still see his signature rhythmic timing and movements.

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    Yeah, I know. That timing is just insane, especially when the third cut goes on for thirteen seconds. Damn.
    TCG | Let's Sakuga: Discussing animation and the people who make it!

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    Just stumbled across this video of un-credited animators from Dragon Ball Z episode #152 made by the ever sharp Kei17. Looks like Yamamuro Tadayoshi of Shindou Pro was able to get in-house animators Miyahara Naoki, Satou Masaki (Studio Junio) and Nakatsuru Katsuyoshi to help out with some key animation drawings.



    Credited key animators include: Yamamuro Tadayoshi, Shibata Noriko, Ehara Hitoshi, and Seki Akemi.

    This is always a lot of fun to see. I think there have been other instances of un-credited animators before, like Nakatsuru helping out on one of the episodes during Gokuu's training.

    Also, all that crystal-clear Wakamoto Norio.
    TCG | Let's Sakuga: Discussing animation and the people who make it!

  8. #88
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    GWOtaku is online now Moderator
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    Action footage from Star Driver the Movie. Edit: more shots came up credited to multiple staff, I'm listing them and tagging for size.



    Spoiler:

    These two are being credited to key animation from Shingo Abe (also the mechanical animation director, it so happens).






    Yutaka Nakamura:




    Hironori Tanaka:


    Norimitsu Suzuki:









    Also here's another good informative Sakuga video recently uploaded, focusing on the Production I.G. movie Jin-Roh: The Wolf Brigade. Discotek will be rereleasing this in the future.

    I would suggest that it's not the medium, but the quality of perception and expression, that determines the significance of art. But what would a cartoonist know? -Bill Watterson


  9. #89
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    Those Star Driver the Movie GIFs are fantastic. I love me some Studio Bones... They're definitely my favorite production company.

    The Jin-Roh MAD is also great. I'm always amazed by Okiura Hiroyuki's perfect line work and construction... It's stunning.

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    Murad has also put up a MAD for Hosoda Mamoru's One Piece movie. This movie really blows the others out of the water. I don't know how Toei ever let Hosoda slip through the cracks.
    TCG | Let's Sakuga: Discussing animation and the people who make it!

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